More Markets, Cheese 101, and Other Food Events

FARM FRESH If a farmers market is not yet open near you, have hope, for more seem to open each weekend, with most locations remaining open until September or October. Today marks the grand opening of the Duvall Farmers Market, which operates Wednesdays from 3 to 7 p.m. at First Avenue Northeast and Stephens Street. This Saturday the Snoqualmie Farmers Market opens on King Street at Railroad Avenue; it runs Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Some of the more exotic offerings you're likely to find at these and other local markets include: English peas, daikon radish, and Japanese cucumbers. To locate a farmers market close to you, visit www.pugetsoundfresh.org. Advance registration or reservations are recommended for most of the following events. Prices exclusive of tax and gratuity unless otherwise noted. Wednesday, June 6 If you happen to be a cheese-aholic, and want to learn more about your indulgence, enroll in Cheese 101: Introduction to Artisan Cheese. Experts from Beecher's Handmade Cheese will school you in the history of the artisan cheese-making process, teach you how to recognize different types of cheese, and offer a range of American artisan cheeses for tasting. There'll be wine pairings as well. $50, 21 and over only. 6:30–9 p.m. 104 Pike St., No. 200 (one block from the Beecher's shop in Pike Place Market), www.beecherscheese.com. DOWNTOWN Thursday, June 7 Sommelier Thomas Price is hosting a wine dinner at Luau Polynesian Lounge, pairing wines from Washington, Oregon, France, and (yes) Hungary with a Hawaiian-inspired menu: tuna tartare with wasabi crème frâiche, seared Japanese spice-crusted tenderloin with cumin demi-glace, and bananas Foster. $50. 6 p.m. Luau Polynesian Lounge, 2253 N. 56th St., 633-5828, www.luaupolynesianlounge.com. RAVENNA Thursdays, June 7–July 26 "The single easiest and best thing most of us can do to prevent cancer or its recurrence is to eat right," says Jennifer Reilly, R.D.; "More than a third of all cancer deaths in this country are due to poor diet." She's a senior nutritionist for D.C.-based nonprofit the Cancer Project, sponsor of a free six-class Cancer Prevention and Survival Cooking Course, teaching participants the health benefits of a low-fat, vegetarian diet. The classes will focus on advice for maintaining a healthy weight and information about antioxidants, phytochemicals, and immune-boosting foods. We know what's good for us, but this class will teach students how to make healthy foods taste good. Free. 10 a.m.–noon or 6–8 p.m. Whole Foods, 888 116th Ave. N.E., 425-462-1400, www.cancerproject.org. BELLEVUE Friday, June 8 Big Bowl Noodle House hosts an unusual event: a grand-opening benefit lunch honoring the owner of the noodle shop that used to occupy their space. Parichad Khumpitak, who ran Super Bowl Noodle House, passed away recently from liver cancer. The offerings are from Big Bowl's usual menu, which features Thai items like pad thai and tom yum. All proceeds will benefit cancer research foundations. Prices vary. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Big Bowl Noodle House, 814 N.E. 65th St., 985-6855. RAVENNA Sunday, June 10 Rosé wine has its adamant fans as well as detractors. The French are connoisseurs of the pink stuff, which seems to be gaining new popularity. Want to learn why? Taught by Campagne's wine steward, Jake Kosseff (named Best Young Sommelier in America by Chaine de Rotisseurs), Pink Primer offers an overview of this sometimes maligned wine. On the patio, if the weather gods allow. $40. 4:30–6 p.m. Campagne, 86 Pine St., 728-2800, www.campagnerestaurant.com. PIKE PLACE MARKET Food and/or beverage news or events? E-mail food@seattleweekly.com.

 
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