Cary Moon. Photo by Alex Garland

Still No Late-Voter Surge for Nikkita Oliver

Cary Moon retains second-place position; Oliver running out of time to catch up.

Cary Moon’s lead over Nikkita Oliver grew again on Thursday.

In the race to face frontrunner Jenny Durkan in the general election, Moon now has a 16.72 percent share of the current vote totals from Tuesday’s election, about two points above Oliver. In total votes, that represents a 2,576 vote advantage for Moon, up from 1,978 after yesterday’s ballot drop. Both are trailing well behind Durkan, who has 30 percent of the vote as of Thursday.

Thursday was seen as an important ballot drop for Oliver. While the early vote counts have consisted of mail-in ballots that are considered to be typically from older homeowners, almost all of the 40,000 Seattle ballots counted today were from drop boxes, and represented a possible cache of last-minute voters who are assumed to be younger and more left-leaning, and perhaps more likely to vote for Oliver. Moon herself predicted a late surge from Oliver as same-day ballots were counted. “Nikkita’s numbers are going to rise. I will not be surprised if Nikkita overtakes me,” she said on election night.

While Oliver is picking up lots of late votes—and holding a steady distance from Moon in terms of vote percentage— overtaking Moon is seeming less and less likely, though no one is yet declaring victory or conceding defeat. A representative for the Oliver campaign said it would not be putting out a statement Thursday, and Moon celebrated the numbers in a written statement, but said “we’re not yet claiming victory.”

Moon did seem to be turning her sites to the general election, though, taking a swipe at her presumed opponent in the statement. “Only two of us will be on the ballot this fall, and I’m encouraged that close to 60 percent of Seattle’s primary election voters chose one of the five leading candidates who was not backed by big corporations and city hall insiders,” she said.

An estimated 40,000 more ballots from Seattle will be counted Friday.

In the City Council Position 8 race, Sara Nelson conceded Thursday night after a disappointing showing in which Jon Grant expanded his lead for second place over Nelson by 2,500 votes. As opposed to Oliver, there was little expectation that Nelson would see a late surge following election night, and Grant’s campaign has already declared victory. Grant will face Teresa Mosqueda in the general election; frontrunner Mosqueda now has 31.7 percent of the vote.

dperson@seattleweekly.com

This story has been updated to reflect that Nelson has conceded.

More in News & Comment

Protestors gather at SeaTac’s Families Belong Together rally. Photo by Alex Garland
Seattle’s Separated Children

A local non-profit houses several immigrant youths who were separated from their parents at the border. But for how long?

Katrina Johnson, Charleena Lyles’ cousin, speaks at a press conference for De-Escalate Washington’s I-940 on July 6, 2017. Photo by Sara Bernard
Communities of Color Respond to Police Chief Best’s Nomination

Although its a mixed bag for some, the families affected by police shootings say she’s the best one for the job.

While King County Metro has been testing out several trial electric buses since since 2016, the agency aims to have a fully electric bus fleet by 2040. Photo by SounderBruce/Flickr
King County Rolls on With Its Electric Bus Fleet Plans

With an overhaul set by 2040, a new report shows the economic and health benefits of going electric.

Nikkita Oliver speaks at a July 17 No New Youth Jail press conference in front of the construction site of the King County Youth Detention Center. Photo by Josh Kelety
King County Youth Detention Center Moves Forward Despite Opposition

As community criticism of the project mounts, King County tries to take a middle road.

Trouble in Tacoma

A cannabis producer has been shut down for “numerous and substantial violations.”

Between Seattle’s $15 minimum wage and the new no-poach cause agreement, Washington has been leading the nation in advancing fast food workers’ rights. Photo by Fibonacci Blue/Flickr
Washington AG’s Deal Grants Mobility to Fast Food Workers Nationwide

Seven fast food chains have agreed to end no-poaching policies that economists say cause wage stagnation.

The Carlton Complex wildfire burned in north-central Washington state in 2014. Photo by Jason Kriess/Wikimedia Commons
King County Burn Ban Starts This Weekend

Other counties across the state have already enacted similar restrictions.

Numerous complaints against King County Sheriff’s deputies for issues like excessive force and improper search and seizure weren’t investigated due to internal misclassification, a new report says. Photo by Oran Viriyincy/Flickr
Report Finds Complaints Against King County Sheriff’s Deputies Weren’t Investigated

An outside review says that allegations of excessive force and racially-biased policing weren’t pursued.

Most Read