Deputy Who Shot and Killed Burien Man Three Weeks Ago On Leave Again After Fatal Collision in Fife

Cesar Molina had returned to work following the shooting of Tommy Le.

A King County deputy who struck a pedestrian on his way home from work early Friday morning was the same deputy who shot and killed a man in Burien in June.

The King County Sheriff’s Office says the pedestrian was standing in “the middle of the roadway” on Pacific Highway South in Fife shortly after 2 a.m. when Deputy Cesar Molina—who was driving home following his shift in Burien—struck the pedestrian. The pedestrian was subsequently struck by another car and died at the scene.

Molina was the same deputy who shot and killed Tommy Le in Burien three weeks ago. The shooting has come under scrutiny because while it was reported that Le had a knife, it was later determined he was holding a pen when Molina shot and killed him.

The Sheriff’s Office says that following the June 13th shooting, Molina attended “a critical incident stress debriefing and met with a mental health professional. Finally, he saw a departmentally approved psychologist who approved his return to work, which occurred June 30th.”

Following the pedestrian fatality, Molina is on administrative leave pending results of the investigation. According to information previously released about Molina, he has been with the King County Sheriff’s Office for about two and a half years. Prior to that, he spent over two years with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

dperson@seattleweekly.com

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