Eric LaFontaine

Eric LaFontaine

Eric LaFontaine Named Seattle Weekly Publisher

The newspaper veteran plans to build upon a legacy of vital journalism.

Seattle Weekly has named Eric LaFontaine as its new publisher, placing him in charge of all digital and print operations and development of the 42-year-old publication.

Since last fall, LaFontaine has served as publisher of Sound Publishing’s Eastside news group. There he has overseen an overhaul of seven suburban publications, working with editorial director Mark Baumgarten to retool the group’s news and production operations, introduce a print redesign, and develop the company’s flagship podcast, Seattleland. He will continue in that capacity as he takes the helm of The Weekly, another Sound publication.

“I am very humbled to have this opportunity,” says LaFontaine. “In the 5 years that Sound Publishing has owned Seattle Weekly, the paper has grown into an increasingly vital voice in this community. We have undergone a great amount of transformation over the last 6 month, but the mission remains the same: to tell the stories of the people who give this city life. I’m looking forward to helping continue that tradition and to strengthen The Weekly’s position in this competitive media market.”

A Richland native, LaFontaine received a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Washington and an MBA from Regis University. With a passion for community journalism and a knowledge of the digital realm, LaFontaine previously served as publisher of the daily Columbia Basin Herald—the largest newspaper in Grant County—as well as the Hagadone Media-owned weekly newspapers in the Moses Lake area. Prior to that, he served as a journalist in the Naval Reserve.

LaFontaine is committed to deepening the Weekly’s local impact while also utilizing resources at Sound’s other area publications to solidify its regional coverage. “Our strength lies in our staff and the tremendous journalism talent we have in the field on a daily basis,” he says. “Our audience drives our vision forward, and with our audience at the forefront, our path becomes a little more clear each day.”

LaFontaine and his family live in Beaux Arts. He says that he was once an avid marathon runner and, as soon as he has time, plans to become one again.

Have thoughts about The Weekly? Email him at elafontaine@soundpublishing.com.

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