PREMIERE: Brakebill Holds a Light to the Darkness in “Rochester Rut” Video

The stark, animated video from local artist Annisa Amalia finds power in simplicity.

There really are times in life when less is more. The video for “Rochester Rut,” the first from Seattle artist and producer Brakebill’s 2016 EP Hiding Places, takes that clichéd mantra to heart.

While the song, like the others on Hiding Places, features complex production with ambient synths and heavily stylized vocals, the video, skillfully directed by new media artist Annisa Amalia, is stripped all the way down. It takes place in the dark, with the blackness taking the form of an animated character that engulfs Brakebill. The artist holds lightbulbs that illuminate his face as he raps similarly dark tales of his determination to not become like his father. The eternal blackness and the sadness of the dim blue light become the perfect setting for Brakebill’s heart-wrenching lyrics. Catch a first look at the video below:

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