Outdoor Stage: The Whore Moans, Siberian, the Pharmacy .

Voyager One

9 p.m.

Half epic rock band, half hypnotists, Voyager One will dilate your pupils with the dreamy wall of haze they create. Their music is a big, majestic swirl of romantic space-rock. It's catchy and mesmerizing, something often attempted but rarely achieved by young bands. Fans of Valium-friendly bands My Bloody Valentine, Spiritualized, and Primal Scream should definitely pay attention. A new album, Afterhours in the Afterlife, is due sometime next year, so expect a test-run of some new material here. BRIAN J. BARR

"Awesome"

8 p.m.

To borrow from Bill Graham: "Awesome" aren't the best at what they do...they're the only ones that do what they do. It is hard to say exactly what it is that they do, but I can tell you that in their music, there are traces of Paul McCartney, Frank Zappa, and They Might Be Giants. They take pop hooks and mix them with jazz-fusion breakdowns that stop on a dime. Which is to say it's brainy, catchy, quirky, and arty. It's also theatrical. They have a new album, Beehive Sessions, which was produced by the Posies' Jon Auer and captures all the precision and clarity of their live show. To see them is to be completely awed by what masters and visionaries they are. BRIAN J. BARR

The Pharmacy

7 p.m.

I like to imagine the Pharmacy holed up in their basement all winter. The rain is streaking the window wells, the dehumidifier's helpless against the moisture. And there are four guys trying desperately to kill the drizzly blues by plunking out art-pop on their instruments. Oh, and they're also drinking beer, of course. The resulting songs are quirky, Beatles-informed tunes filled with quick tempo changes, fuzzy vocals, and cowbells. It's cluttered like a scrapbook and yet catchy as hell. BRIAN J. BARR

The Valley

6 p.m.

It's always a thrill to watch a young band evolve far beyond their initial potential. When the Valley's profile first began to rise around town, it was because they seemed to represent an amusing grunge-revival sound, all thrashing hair and predictably heavy power chords. Their self-titled, full-length debut on Swingline records in 2005 reflected that simplistic sound, albeit with plenty of sharp hooks that made it a perfectly serviceable party soundtrack. However, their recently released six-song EP (also eponymous) kicks up the originality level by several notches, both sonically and structurally. The Valley now sound like a muscular, punk-minded monster that finally found its own voice and is wielding it with masterful confidence that is anything but retrogressive. HANNAH LEVIN

Triumph of Lethargy Skinned Alive to Death

4 p.m.

The legacy of the Murder City Devils is littered with empty bottles and broken hearts, so it's only fitting that frontman Spencer Moody's subsequent acronym-inducing project would seem to be all about smashing conventions. TOLSATD don't so much play music as dismantle it, eschewing tradition and pigeonholing by using howls, whispers, discordant instrumentation, and a gruesomely gorgeous lyrical palette (when lyrics actually make it on to their twisted canvas). Grad-school ambitions caused MCD and Modest Mouse alum Dann Gallucci to cede his TOLSATD drumming duties to former Pretty Girls Make Graves frontwoman Andrea Zollo, whose organic, instinctive approach to percussive texture only deepens the mystery. HANNAH LEVIN

The Whore Moans

3 p.m.

If "not for the faint at heart" were a bona fide musical genre, the Whore Moans would be its flagship band, right alongside the Blood Brothers (and the band that follows them today, Triumph of Lethargy Skinned Alive to Death). Cherub-faced frontman Jonny Henningson's venomous vocal shrieks alarm and invigorate the frenzied crowds they draw, and their unfiltered energy makes standing still utterly impossible. That said, Watch Out for This Thing, their strong debut record released earlier this year, gets extra marks for its unexpected melodic touches, a sweet trick that makes them as listenable as they are antagonizing. HANNAH LEVIN

Sunday Night Blackout

2 p.m.

If any band at REVERBfest has the power to induce a midday buzz, it's definitely Sunday Night Blackout. Aside from the obvious connotations of their name, their formula is simple but effective: A foundation of classic rock, a smidge of vintage punk, and plenty of heavy-metal muscle inform their sound. If you haven't felt inspired to hit the Smoke Shop for a Jack and Coke yet, then take this band as your cue. HANNAH LEVIN

Siberian

5 p.m.

There aren't too many cities like Seattle, where a simple demo and little bit of buzz on the streets can help a band get that demo repeated plays on the radio—and sign a deal with a well-distributed local label in the process. Before Grand Archives and the Cave Singers, Siberian were Seattle's hottest unsigned act. That is, until the foursome—lead vocalist/guitarist Finn Parnell, bassist Zach Tillman, guitarist Colin Wolberg, and drummer Aaron Benson—signed with Sonic Boom Recordings, who released their six-song debut EP, Hey Celestial!, earlier this year. (Coincidentally enough, the EP included polished-up versions of songs from the demo.)

For a band that's only a few years old, Siberian play like masters, having achieved their own soaring sound, naturally, with growth. With the group's membership now at five, all those gliding guitar overtures and delicate hooks have been stacked on a wall of dreamy extremities and elegantly captured in a period that has flashed before our eyes. It took comparable melodic alt-rock and indie buzz bands of today (Snow Patrol) and yesterday (Ride, The Bends–era Radiohead) years and stacks of cash to come into their own. Not here.

Parnell is no stranger to taking the band places; much of the force behind the songs' get-up-and-go is within the music as much as it is Parnell's lyrics. "Making out the shapes, covered in your skin, shows you what you are, where you have been," he caressingly reveals on "Places You've Been" before smashing memories to bits in the chorus.

On the band's forthcoming debut full-length, With Me, the prospect of finding love and freedom is the continuing theme. The ripping opener, "Belgian Beers and Catholic Girls," "Paper Birds" (off Hey Celestial!), and the bold closer, "Islands Forever," are in harmony with the album's overall fluctuating motions. Obviously, Siberian have all the ingredients to yield worldwide megastardom, but for now, we shouldn't be terribly disappointed that they're still our little secret. TRAVIS RITTER

 
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