Example of adventure pack offered by the King County Library System. Courtesy Photo.

Example of adventure pack offered by the King County Library System. Courtesy Photo.

Use your King County library card to explore the outdoors

KCLS cardholders can check out a Discover Pass for two weeks to explore public lands.

King County Library System makes it easy for cardholders to enjoy Washington State Parks and other public lands for free with its adventure packs.

Included in each adventure pack is a Discover Pass for free parking, pocket guides to plants and wildlife and a pair of binoculars. King County Library System (KCLS) has around 200 adventure packs that cardholders can check out for two weeks at a time, according to KCLS.

“With the Check Out Washington program, a KCLS library card becomes your ticket to outdoor adventures,” said KCLS Executive Director Lisa Rosenblum. “We are thrilled to offer more adventure packs to King County residents, and we thank all Check Out Washington partners for making this expansion possible.”

The Discover Passes offers access to millions of acres of recreation lands in Washington, including 100 state parks, over 350 campgrounds and 700 water access points. For more information about what the Discover Pass offers access to visit Discoverpass.wa.gov

Check Out Washington is an interagency program in partnership with the Washington State Parks and state libraries and is funded in part by the Washington State Parks Foundation. The program’s goal is to make the state’s recreation land more accessible to disadvantaged communities.

The program was able to increase the number of Discover Passes this year because it received additional funding from the Washington State Employees Credit Union. The expansion tripled the capacity of the program, according to KCLS.

“We are so excited to support Washington State Parks, the Washington State Parks Foundation and the State Library System with the expansion of Check Out Washington,” said WSECU Vice President of Public Relations Ann Flannigan. “This program helps remove access barriers to state lands and provides any resident with an opportunity to experience these public treasures.”

Patrons of the KCLS can check the availability of the adventure packs online through the KCLS website.


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@seattleweekly.com.

More in News & Comment

Fedor Osipov, 15, flips into Steel Lake in Federal Way during last year's heatwave on June 28, 2021. Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing
Heatwave expected to hit King County

Temperatures will likely reach 90 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday, June 26, and Monday, June 27.

t
Des Moines Police arrest murder suspect in Kent | Update

Medical examiner identifies body found June 20 in Duwamish River

Photo courtesy of King County.
Officials urge caution when swimming this summer

Cold spring temperatures and larger than normal snowpack have created dangerous conditions

File photo
Fireworks ban takes effect this year in unincorporated King County

The new law does not extend to cities, which each have their own regulations around fireworks.

A semiautomatic handgun with a safety cable lock that prevents loading ammunition. (Sound Publishing file photo)
Large-capacity ammo magazine sales ban starts soon in Washington

Starting July 1, a 10-round capacity becomes the limit for sales. Meanwhile, “there is a rush on magazine purchasing.”

At Dash Point on June 16, 2022. Henry Stewart-Wood/Sound Publishing
All that the tides reveal: Puget Sound’s hidden intertidal world

Exploring King County beaches during the lowest tide in the last 13 years.

Main Street Bridge. Courtesy of WSDOT.
Full closure of I-405 set for Father’s Day weekend in Bellevue

Signs with detour routes will be available; closure will take place from June 17-20 to demolish Main Street Bridge.

Threats allegedly made by a Juanita High School student (Screenshot from Tweet made by @garywalton73)
Juanita High School student charged with felonies after threatening peers on social media

“You’ll end up like this kids in Uvalde,” local student threatened classmates.

Most Read