Robert Brown, an advocate for splitting the state of Washington into two, at a rally at the Capitol in Olympia last week. Photo by Sean Harding, WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Robert Brown, an advocate for splitting the state of Washington into two, at a rally at the Capitol in Olympia last week. Photo by Sean Harding, WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Split Washington In Two? 51st State Movement Highlights Cultural Divide

Rep. Matt Shea of Spokane introduces bill to establish state in Eastern Washington called Liberty.

By Emma Scher, WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Robert Brown is a resident of Stevens County in Eastern Washington, but he believes the policies coming out of Olympia don’t reflect what he values.

The issues he considers important are Second Amendment rights, taxation and border security. And Brown is one of the many who have rallied behind the newest movement to split his state into two.

The idea isn’t new, but has most recently been spearheaded by Rep. Matt Shea, R-Spokane Valley. This year, Shea proposed House Bill 1509 to the Legislature to divide Washington at the Cascade crest, establishing a 51st state in Eastern Washington called Liberty.

Public policy experts have noted that the Cascade mountains mark an observable difference between Washington’s more conservative, rural east side and its more liberal, urban west side.

Proposals to split the state date back to 1905, including proposals to simply split apart, or to combine with parts of Eastern Oregon or the panhandle of Idaho.

“I’ve never seen a state that’s so — as soon as you come over that mountain pass — so divided. I mean night-and-day difference,” Brown said.

But Western Washington has a much higher population than Eastern Washington, and thus, more representation in the Legislature.

According to the Washington Office of Financial Management’s 2018 population estimates, Eastern Washington’s most populous county is Spokane County, which has less than 25 percent of the population of Western Washington’s King County.

Because it is less populated, Eastern Washington sends only 33 legislators to Olympia, whereas Western Washington sends 114. This year, just three of the 84 Democrats in the Legislature are from Eastern Washington.

According to Cornell Clayton, a public policy professor at Washington State University, this has led to some “cultural Republicans” in Eastern Washington feeling as though their values aren’t represented in the Legislature, especially when it comes to social issues like abortion, gun control and “church-state issues.”

“These are folks who…take these cultural issues and wage culture wars, and it’s them who are aggrieved by the policies that come out of Olympia, because they feel engulfed by a Western Washington culture,” Clayton said.

King County in Western Washington and Lincoln County in Eastern Washington show both ends of the state’s political spectrum. The cultural clash was evident in the 2016 Presidential election — 72 percent of King County voters chose Hillary Clinton, while the same percentage of Lincoln County voters choose Donald Trump.

Two years later, it was seen again in Washington’s passage of Initiative 1639 in the 2018 general election. The initiative raised the minimum age to purchase a semi-automatic rifle to 21, redefined the rifles as “assault rifles,” added more stringent background checks, increased waiting periods and enacted storage requirements. Eighteen of the 20 counties in Eastern Washington rejected the initiative.

In Western Washington, King County voted to pass I-1639 by the highest margin, with 76 percent of voters in approval. In Eastern Washington, Lincoln County voted against the initiative by the highest margin, with 75 percent disapproving.

But King County’s 76 percent accounted for more than 730,000 votes, while Lincoln county’s 75 percent accounted for only around 4,000.

Divergences like this one has led some residents like Brown — whose county similarly had 73 percent of voters against Initiative 1639 and 67 percent favoring Donald Trump — to say they are treated “kind of like the red-headed stepchildren just shoved in the corner.”

And his county is almost exactly that: it shares a border with British Columbia, and is only one county away from the Idaho border.

Gun rights issues have underscored this year’s revival to splinter the state.

On Feb. 15, 51st state supporters and gun rights advocates rallied in Washington’s capitol building rotunda, hearing speeches from a domestic violence survivor, a former prosecuting attorney, and Reps. Shea and Jesse Young, R-Gig Harbor.

“There’s this constant claim in Olympia that we’re all one Washington and share the same values, but the fact is that we don’t share the same values on a whole lot of things,” Rep. Shea said in an interview.

While state secession is illegal, the U.S. Constitution outlines ways for new states to be added with consent of affected state legislatures and Congress.

This year, Shea is the prime sponsor for HB 1509 to establish the state of Liberty, and House Joint Memorial 4003 to petition U.S. Congress with the same request. Neither of these bills have been scheduled for a public hearing.

According to Shea, if Puerto Rico’s statehood referendum is approved by Congress, a new state in Washington would balance the U.S. Senate by establishing 52 states in America.

Rep. Shea proposed similar bills in 2015 and 2016. None of the bills have progressed past a first reading, but that doesn’t mean the discussion will die down anytime soon.

According to Professor Clayton, what’s going on in Washington echoes a national sentiment.

“What it tells us is that in Washington, much like the rest of the country, our politics has become polarized,” he said. “We’ve sorted ourselves out as a country in geographical terms and I think that’s what’s going on in this state and across the country.”

Courtesy of Statesman Examiner

Courtesy of Statesman Examiner

More in News & Comment

Self-driving cars: Heaven or hell?

Depending on factors, traffic and environmental impacts could become better or worse.

King County’s $5 million derelict boat problem

When a boat sinks, it costs a lot to bring it up, with millions being spent since 2003 on removals.

Ashley Hiruko/illustration
Susan’s quest for ‘justice’ and the civil legal system dilemma

While citizens have the right to an attorney in criminal cases, they’re not afforded the same rights in civil litigation.

Upon further review, EPA wants to redo water quality rules

Feds say they’ll use what the state submitted in 2016 even though they’re no longer the state’s faves.

King County Councilman Reagan Dunn sent a letter to the FBI asking for them to help investigate Allan Thomas (pictured), who is under investigation for stealing more than $400,000 of public funds and skirting election laws in an Enumclaw drainage district. Screenshot from King 5 report
King County Council requests report on special districts in wake of fraud allegations

Small, local special districts will face more scrutiny following Enumclaw drainage district case.

The Marquee on Meeker Apartments, 2030 W. Meeker St. in Kent, will feature 492 apartments and 12,000 square feet of retail. The first phase of 288 apartments is expected to be completed in early 2020. Developers are targeting people in their 20s and 30s to rent their high-end, urban-style apartments. Steve Hunter/staff photo
Housing study pokes holes in conventional wisdom

High construction and land costs will incentivize developers to build luxury units.

File photo
Eviction reform passed by state Legislature

Tenant protections included longer notices and more judicial discretion.

Oh, crab! There’s something fishy about this place

That mysterious eyesore by the sea will be replaced by a new research center. “It’s all going to go.”

With ‘Game of Thrones’ ending, it’s time for a proper feast

How to make a meal inspired by the Lannisters’ and Starks’ world, fit for the King in the North.

Most Read