Joey Thompson gets his first shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at the Ash Way Park-n-Ride site on April 21, 2021 in Lynnwood, Washington. Sound Publishing file photo

Joey Thompson gets his first shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at the Ash Way Park-n-Ride site on April 21, 2021 in Lynnwood, Washington. Sound Publishing file photo

Some people qualify for third shot of vaccine, says health department

New guidance comes as cases skyrocket in Washington and nation.

Health care providers in Washington can now give a third dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to certain people who are immunocompromised, according to the state Department of Health.

The decision to allow this third shot comes after the FDA recommended the third shot for immunocompromised people.

Although the vaccines show high rates of protection against the variants, studies now suggest that people who have moderate to severely compromised immune systems don’t always have the same level of immunity compared to those without compromised immune systems, according to the DOH.

The third shot should be taken at least 28 days after the second shot, according to the DOH.

People who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine should not get another shot at this time, according to the DOH. People who don’t have compromised immune systems do not need a third shot.

The third shot for people with compromised immune systems should not be seen as a booster, but rather as an additional dose for people who never developed the full immunity from the first two shots.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website has a full list of conditions that qualify people for the third shot.

COVID-19 cases across the country and in Washington have surged in recent weeks. Over the last 30 days, both King and Pierce counties have seen COVID-19 cases rise between 300 and 599%, according to the DOH. Much of this increase is attributed to the new highly contagious Delta variant.

Even after immunocompromised people get their third shot, the DOH still recommends wearing a mask and socially distancing to protect themselves from the virus.




Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@seattleweekly.com.

More in News & Comment

File photo
Do you need to pay for your COVID hospital stay?

Washington state law requires hospitals to provide free care for certain income brackets.

Puget Sound renters will need housing assistance
Puget Sound renters will need housing assistance

Nonprofits, activists are expecting greater need as workers are laid off.

Stock photo
State AG Ferguson leads effort supporting local journalism

Federal legislation offers tax credits to subscribers, businesses and news organizations

C-17 at Joint Base Lewis McChord airstrip (courtesy of United States Military)
King County councilmember proposes program to aid transition of Afghan interpreters who served the U.S. overseas

Program would provide job training and learning opportunities for Afghan interpreters and advisors.

Vaccinations taking place. File photo
Inslee: No ‘massive disruptions’ as worker vax rates hit 90%

A surge in vaccinations has eased concern about service slowdowns ahead of a Monday deadline.

King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert (file photo)
Lambert removed from King County Council leadership roles

Lambert received backlash after her campaign used flyers that depicted her opponent as a puppet.

Union members picket in front of new Facebook campus in Redmond on Sept. 16 (photo by Cameron Sheppard)
Northwest Carpenters Union members vote to accept contract with AGC

The agreement comes after weeks of striking.

King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert (file photo)
After doubling down on “racist” flyer, Lambert publicly apologizes

Apology encouraged by King County Council colleagues.

Courtesy of King County Police Officers Guild
Office lacks power over King County law enforcement in misconduct investigations

Director Tamer Abouzeid presents OLEO annual report to law and justice committee on Tuesday.

Most Read