Inside a culvert trap, a black bear nicknamed “Black Pearl” waits for her release into a meadow in the Cascade Mountains on Tuesday. (PAWS)

Inside a culvert trap, a black bear nicknamed “Black Pearl” waits for her release into a meadow in the Cascade Mountains on Tuesday. (PAWS)

Running wild: Healed from injuries, a bear roams free again

She suffered pelvic fractures in December. Wildlife officers released her in the Cascades this week.

The metal door opened on the trailer. People shouted. The bear bolted.

With two trained Karelian bear dogs in pursuit, “Black Pearl” hightailed it into the woods.

Five months to the day since she’d been found with pelvic fractures off the side of a highway, and after a long recovery, this adult female American black bear was back in the wild.

“We’re going to push it out and let it go,” state Fish & Wildlife Officer Nicholas Jorg explained to a dozen or so onlookers before the release on Tuesday. “Once we call the dogs off and all the noise, then the bear will have a big sense of relief and feel safe once it’s a safe, acceptable distance away from a group of people.”

Jorg also told people to yell, “Get out, bear,” to make sure she got the message.

The bystanders stood in pickup beds. The bear was inside a culvert trap — a big, corrugated drain pipe on a trailer bed — that Jorg had towed behind his department pickup that morning to a meadow in the Cascade Range. The journey started at the PAWS Wildlife Center in Lynnwood, where the bear had been recuperating from surgery, under expert care.

So she wouldn’t think too kindly of her human benefactors, another state Fish & Wildlife officer, Jesse Ward, shot a non-lethal bean-bag round at her hind quarters. Ward quickly fired off two cracker shells that sounded like July 4 fireworks.

It was over in about 20 seconds. Black Pearl was in her new home.

The release had been a long time in the making.

Fish & Wildlife officers received the initial report about the bear on Dec. 2, suggesting she dragged herself off a road after being struck by a car. She was on the Kitsap Peninsula, near Poulsbo, but they were unable to locate her at first. A few days later, they returned with dogs to track her.

Because she was captured Dec. 7, the anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attacks, they nicknamed her Pearl. As a black bear, her name evolved to Black Pearl, a fictional ship in Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean” movies.

Aside from the fractures, the bear appeared to be in excellent health. Officers called PAWS — the Progressive Animal Welfare Society — which runs a hospital for sick and injured wildlife across the parking lot from the companion animal shelter that’s familiar to much of the public.

X-rays showed multiple rib and pelvic fractures. To heal their patient, who weighed at least 300 pounds, PAWS staff knew they would need to bring in other veterinary specialists and get access to a larger operating room. They also wanted to make sure the bear’s birth canal wasn’t damaged, so that someday she might become pregnant without putting her life in danger.

Dr. John Huckabee, the veterinary program manager at PAWS, enlisted help from the Woodland Park Zoo and the Veterinary Specialty Center of Seattle. On Dec. 13, their team immobilized the bear for transport in the zoo’s ambulance.

Inside a culvert trap, a bear nicknamed “Black Pearl” waits for her release into a meadow in the Cascade Mountains as Washington State Fish & Wildlife Officer Nicholas Jorg directs vehicles to create a path to the woods on Tuesday. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Inside a culvert trap, a bear nicknamed “Black Pearl” waits for her release into a meadow in the Cascade Mountains as Washington State Fish & Wildlife Officer Nicholas Jorg directs vehicles to create a path to the woods on Tuesday. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

At Woodland Park’s operating room, three veterinarians and six veterinary technicians from the different groups got to work. They put pelvic fragments into alignment with metal plates and screws, like an orthopedic surgeon would use on a human. Afterward, they drove their ursine patient back to PAWS to recover on a straw bed inside a secure enclosure.

Over the coming months, they tried to avoid any human interaction — even with staff. As with the release, they wanted to preserve her instinctual suspicion of people. They used video monitors to track her progress.

By New Year’s Day, the bear was eating and walking between naps. She dined on dog food, fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds and other proteins that staff hid in her enclosure. By early March, the bear’s use of her legs appeared nearly normal, staff said at the time.

“We’ve known for a while that she would be OK to be released,” said Jeff Brown, a PAWS wildlife naturalist who witnessed her release. “We just wanted to make sure the conditions were right.”

That meant waiting for spring when there would be plenty of food in the growing forests. Also, they wanted to ensure she had fully awakened from her winter slumber.

“She was still in a state of hibernation until at least a month ago,” Brown said.

PAWS has taken in at least 125 bears since 1986. Most are cubs, not adults. Black Pearl’s case also was unusual because of her severe injuries.

Present at Tuesday’s release were the two wildlife officers and a pair of Karelian bear dogs named Colter and Freya. There were staff from PAWS, two vet techs from Woodland Park Zoo who had worked on the bear, and three journalists.

Washington State Fish & Wildlife officer Nicholas Jorg directs his Karelian bear dogs named Colter and Freya to bark before releasing “Black Pearl” into a meadow in the Cascade Mountains on Tuesday. The journey for the bear started at the PAWS Wildlife Center in Lynnwood, where she recuperated from surgery after being hit by a vehicle in Kitsap County. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Washington State Fish & Wildlife officer Nicholas Jorg directs his Karelian bear dogs named Colter and Freya to bark before releasing “Black Pearl” into a meadow in the Cascade Mountains on Tuesday. The journey for the bear started at the PAWS Wildlife Center in Lynnwood, where she recuperated from surgery after being hit by a vehicle in Kitsap County. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

The Hansen family came along as well: parents Chad and Jennifer, with their children, Ole, 4, and Aksel, 2.

The Seattle family won an auction a few years ago — the prize was to witness Department of Fish & Wildlife officers release a bear.

At the time, they had talked to Jorg, a canine handler, at length about the Karelian bear dogs. The couple especially admired the Karelians because they own a Norwegian elkhound, another hearty and fluffy breed of working dog from the far north.

Work and family conflicts forced them to pass up an opportunity to see a bear released about two years ago.

When Jorg followed up recently, the Hansens made sure Chad had the day off from his job in property management.

“We’re just here as really lucky guests,” Jennifer Hansen said Tuesday afternoon, as Black Pearl presumably lumbered through the woods nearby. “I feel like we got to see a very happy ending for this bear. Now, she hopefully gets to live a very long and normal, healthy life.”

Noah Haglund: 425-339-3465; nhaglund@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @NWhaglund.

Help a bear

It costs PAWS an average of $4,000 to care for an adult American black bear, or $3,500 for a cub, from intake through release. Donations to the nonprofit wildlife center are accepted at paws.org.

Image from video of a black bear’s release in the Cascade Mountains on Tuesday. (PAWS)

Image from video of a black bear’s release in the Cascade Mountains on Tuesday. (PAWS)

Washington State Fish & Wildlife officers Nicholas Jorg and Jesse Ward wait for dogs to return from chasing “Black Pearl” into the woods in the Cascade Mountains on Tuesday. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Washington State Fish & Wildlife officers Nicholas Jorg and Jesse Ward wait for dogs to return from chasing “Black Pearl” into the woods in the Cascade Mountains on Tuesday. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

More in News & Comment

Matt Marshall, leader of the Washington Three Percenters gun rights group, addresses a crowd rallying for Second Amendment rights Jan. 17 at the state Capitol in Olympia. Marshall condemned Republican leadership in the House of Representatives, which expelled Rep. Matt Shea from the Republican Caucus. Marshall announced his candidacy for the 2nd District seat held by House Minority Leader J.T. Wilcox. Photo by Cameron Sheppard, WNPA News Service
Gun rights advocates rally at Capitol

Criticism levied at Matt Shea investigation, Republican leadership.

Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson (center) announced a lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson in a press conference Jan. 2. Debbie Warfield of Everett (left) lost her son to a heroin overdose in 2012. Skagit County Commissioner Lisa Janicki (right) lost her son to an overdose of OxyContin in 2017. They are joined by Rep. Lauren Davis of Shoreline (second from right), founder of the Washington Recovery Alliance. (TVW screenshot)
AG Bob Ferguson talks lawsuits, gun control

Washington state Attorney General stopped by Sound Publishing’s Kirkland office.

Sen. Mona Das, D-Kent, the primary sponsor of SB 5323, speaking on the bill. (Photo courtesy of Hannah Sabio-Howell)
Proposed law adds a fee to plastic bags at checkout

Senate passes bill to ban single-use plastic bags, place 8-cent fee on reusable plastic bags.

Renton Education Association board voted out by union

Union members use their power to remove leaders from office

In November 2019, Washington voters approved Initiative 976, which calls for $30 car tabs. Sound Publishing file photo
Republicans try to guarantee $30 car tabs amid court hangup

Lawmakers sponsor companion bills in the House and Senate.

King County Metro’s battery-electric bus. Photo courtesy of kingcounty.gov
King County could bump up Metro electrification deadlines

Transportation generates nearly half of all greenhouse gas emissions in the state.

Gov. Jay Inslee delivered his 2020 State of the State Address on Tuesday, Jan. 14. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Office of the Governor)
Gov. Inslee delivers State of the State Address

By Leona Vaughn, WNPA News Service OLYMPIA — Gov. Jay Inslee stood… Continue reading

A 50-minute film called “Spawning Grounds,” which documents the effort to save a freshwater variety of kokanee salmon from Lake Sammamish, is finally ready for its debut in North Bend on Jan. 18. (Screenshot from film)
Spawning Grounds: Lake Sammamish kokanee documentary premieres Jan. 18

The film tracks the ‘all hands on deck’ effort to save the little red fish from extinction.

Family, friends of paraplegic man killed in shootout with Federal Way police outraged over his death

Family says the 23-year-old man’s death was “senseless”; accuse police of excessive force and withholding information that the man used a wheelchair.

Most Read