Kraft and Starbucks: A Bad Breakup

And that means lots of incriminating statements on the Internet.

Last week, Starbucks announced it would be breaking off its 12-year relationship with packaged-product distributor Kraft Foods. Too bad. We really thought they’d last. Since then, however, both companies have engaged in a bit of a press-release pissing match, publishing competing statements about why the other one is, in fact, a stupid doo-doo head.

It started on Thursday with a relatively measured statement from Starbucks, claiming that yeah, we broke up, but no, we’re not gonna talk about it.

“Since 1998, Starbucks packaged coffee has been distributed to grocery stores and other outlets by Kraft Foods. A month ago Starbucks informed Kraft of its intention to end that distribution arrangement. The details and timing around any transition will be subject to further private dialogue. Starbucks . . . will not be providing further details or comments at this time.”

Perhaps stung by being dumped so abruptly, Kraft fired back.

“Kraft Foods’ agreement with Starbucks regarding the sale of packaged coffee in grocery stores and other channels is perpetual. Importantly, if Starbucks decides to exit its relationship with Kraft Foods, the agreement requires Starbucks to pay Kraft Foods the fair market value of the business plus, in certain instances, a premium. Kraft Foods intends to keep the discussions with Starbucks private and will not be providing further details or comments at this time.”

Oh, snap! It seems Kraft is of the opinion that their agreement is etched in fine marble.

Well, glad that’s over. We’ll let the lawyers hash it out . . . Wait, what’s that, Starbucks? You have something else to say?

“We consider it unfortunate that Kraft has chosen to make public statements that we believe mischaracterize the nature of the agreement between our companies, including the term of the agreement. It has been, and continues to be, our intention to keep these conversations private. There is a specific mechanism within the agreement for the resolution of disputes.”

So the gist of it is that Kraft wants Starbucks to pay them whether they distribute their products or not. Starbucks thinks they need to shut their face. And everyone in the world gets to marvel from afar at two companies publicly behaving like children.

More in News & Comment

Victims, law enforcement speak about King County Courthouse conditions

An entrance to the courthouse was closed after an assault.

In this September 2019 photo, George Kirkish, owner and founder of Palouse Winery on Vashon-Maury Island, pours a glass of wine for Lori Coots during tasting room hours. (Kevin Opsahl/Sound Publishing)
King County Council approves controversial winery, brewery ordinance

After five years, the county has updated regulations surrounding alcohol production and tasting.

Washington Low Income Housing Alliance is among supporters of statewide “just cause” legislation to protect tenants in Washington. However, some landlords say removing the ability to quickly remove tenants limits their ability to get rid of problem renters. (Courtesy image)
Tenant advocates prepare for another push in Olympia

Following wins in Burien and Federal Way, just cause evictions are on the 2020 Legislative agenda.

Business alliance serves women of African diaspora in King County

Nourah Yonous launched the African Women Business Alliance in 2017 to find ways to lift women up.

Fire along Twisp River Road in the Okanogan Wenatchee National Forest in 2018. Courtesy photo
Wildfire response: State unveils funding legislation proposal

Last year, Department of Natural Resources responded to record number of wildfires.

A new report, complete with recommendations to the Legislature, has been released by a statewide task force that was formed to address a lack of child care in Washington. File photo
Report outlines lack of child care in Washington

In King County, supply doesn’t meet demand for child care.

You’ve been hacked! Data breaches in Washington on the rise

But fewer people had personal information compromised from cyberattacks in 2019 compared to 2018.

Demonstrators from La Resistencia protest Amazon’s involvement with ICE. Photo courtesy of La Resistencia
How will the U.S. respond to climate refugees?

Business as usual has been harder borders, are there other ways to address climate migration?

Safe drug consumption sites have been recommended by the King County Heroin and Opioid Task Force. Pictured is a safe consumption site in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. Photo supplied by ARCHES in Lethbridge
What’s been happening with safe injection sites?

There hasn’t been much coverage this year compared to the last couple years.

Most Read