Edward Hicks (Courtesy photo)

Edward Hicks (Courtesy photo)

King County Sheriff’s Deputy Fired Over Felony Conviction

The Sheriff’s Office somehow missed his record of assault when hiring him in 2017.

King County sheriff’s deputy Edward Hicks was fired on June 28 after a jury in Michigan found him guilty earlier this week of beating a man back in 2016.

Before getting hired as a King County Sheriff’s deputy in 2017, Hicks worked for the Detroit Police Department, where he was investigated for assaulting a man while on the job. The matter was eventually handed off to the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office, who charged him in 2017 with misdemeanor aggravated assault and felony misconduct in office—the two criminal charges that the Michigan jury upheld on June 25.

In a letter to Deputy Hicks informing him of his firing, King County Sheriff Mitzi Johanknecht wrote: “I find that we are unable to maintain your employment any longer because our policy clearly provides that we cannot employ anyone with a felony criminal conviction.”

According to The Seattle Times, while riding with his partner at the Detroit Police Department, Hicks chased down and vigorously beat a suspect who had initially fled from Hicks, causing substantial facial injuries.

Hicks waived his right to a formal internal hearing with Sheriff Johanknecht on June 27, where he would have been allowed to respond to the jury’s verdict.

It is unclear how this episode escaped the King County Sheriff’s Office when they hired Hicks back in 2017. The office is currently investigating how Hicks was hired back in 2017 despite an ongoing investigations by the Detroit Police Department and Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office, according to spokesperson Ryan Abbott.

jkelety@seattleweekly.com

More in News & Comment

Vashon: An island of chill amid the Seattle-Tacoma rat race

With good food, craft beverages and a relaxed vibe, it offers a quintessential Northwest experience.

What’s next for Washington’s 2045 green energy goal?

The Legislature set the goal, but how does the state actually get there?

Tasting room proposal could redefine alcohol production in King County

Pilot program would benefit wineries, breweries and distilleries. Several farmers are concerned.

William Talbott II, left, listens as his public defender Jon Scott questions potential jurors at the Snohomish County Courthouse on Thursday, June 13, 2019 in Everett, Wash. Snohomish County sheriff’s detective Jim Scharf, right, listens from the prosecutor’s table. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Jury selected for 1987 cold case double murder trial

Opening statements are Friday in William Talbott’s trial for the killing of a young Canadian couple.

WSF cancels ferry sailings this week and next for repairs

Washington State Ferries will cancel several late-night sailings to make repairs at… Continue reading

Class in Everett school prepares students to be translators

A year in, the interpretation and translation course is seeing promising results for bilingual students.

In a 2015 report from the Washington State Department of Ecology, King County’s Cedar Hills Regional Landfill received 53,739 tons of of plastic bags and wrap from housing and commercial sources alone. File photo/Sound Publishing
No good solution to the plastics problem

Plastic is piling up everywhere from King County to ocean floors, and humans keep making more.

Alaska Air adds Palm Springs to Paine Field schedule

Daily service between Everett and the California desert begins Nov. 5.

For 50 years, Zeke’s off US 2 has served delicious burgers

It’s been a popular pit stop in Gold Bar for skiers and hikers, and the same family still runs it.

Most Read