File photo

File photo

King County Metro cancels fares

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, riders in King County take free buses

King County residents can save money by riding the bus now that King County Metro has suspended fares.

Starting Saturday, March 21, buses, water taxis and access paratransit will not collect fares until further notice, a King County Metro press release. Riders are also being asked to enter the bus by the rear door to leave the front door for riders who use mobility devices or need to use the boarding ramp.

“As this crisis evolves, we are constantly reviewing all of our practices and policies to provide the best service while keeping people safe,” King County Executive Dow Constantine stated in the press release. “Changing how riders board and exit our bus fleet and also suspending all fares is part of that effort. It is essential to keep this community on the move, and I thank all operators, mechanics, support staff and rider who are helping us get through this, together.”

These moves acknowledge the direction of public health to take steps necessary to limit the spread of COVID-19, so King County Metro will continue to call on riders to do all they can by avoiding traveling when sick, covering coughs and sneezes.

Metro is relaying these planned changes to its partners at Sound Transit and the City of Seattle as changes to ST Express bus service, Link light rail and Streetcar are considered.

Metro is communicating this upcoming change with transit operators today and working to develop and install signage directing customers to board and exit at the rear doors unless and that fare payment is not required starting March 21.


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