The Carlton Complex wildfire burned in north-central Washington state in 2014. Photo by Jason Kriess/Wikimedia Commons

The Carlton Complex wildfire burned in north-central Washington state in 2014. Photo by Jason Kriess/Wikimedia Commons

King County Burn Ban Starts This Weekend

Other counties across the state have already enacted similar restrictions.

To prevent wildfires amidst a summer heat wave, a burn ban in unincorporated King County will go into effect on Saturday, July 14. All outdoor burning is restricted save for bonfires in designated fire pits on campgrounds or on private property.

Recent arid conditions in the region and minimal expected rainfall in the near future led the King County Fire Marshall to issue the order. According to the National Weather Service, peak temperatures in the Seattle-area are expected to stay above 80 degrees Fahrenheit through next week (Sunday could reach 92 degrees), while little to no precipitation is expected. Pierce, Kitsap, Snohomish, and other counties along the Puget Sound have already enacted burn bans.

King County’s burn ban also requires that sanctioned fires be no larger than 3 feet in diameter, be attended at all times by individuals equipped with a fire extinguisher, remain 25 feet away from any structure, have 20 feet of vertical clearance from overhanging branches, and be 10 feet from any ground-level vegetation.

Summer wildfires—and the accompanying apocalyptic smokey hazes that shroud the region—are becoming routine in Washington state, and are affecting local air quality. Last year, there were roughly 10 wildfires across the state, costing the state $140 million to subdue. According to the state Department of Natural Resources, 75 percent of wildfires in Washington are caused by human behavior.

King County’s burn ban has no scheduled expiration date at this time.

jkelety@seattleweekly.com

More in News & Comment

‘Feedback loops’ of methane, CO2 echo environmental problem beyond Washington

University of Washington among researchers of climate change’s effects in global temperatures.

Early wake-up call: Twin quakes under Monroe rattle region

Thousands of people felt them. They were magnitude 4.6 and 3.5 and hit minutes apart.

Warning sign for a road closure. File photo
King County examines options to fund roads and bridges

Shortfall is roughly $250 million each year; county may seek tax from unincorporated voters.

City of Everett wins in bikini barista federal court case

The baristas are unsure of their next steps but may file for a rehearing, their lawyer said.

As time expires, Eyman lacks signatures for anti-tax measure

In spite of the setback, Eyman still has an initiative dealing with car tabs on the November ballot.

Dozens of wedding gowns stolen from Lynnwood boutique

Some brides-to-be may be left without a dress after a burglary at Brides and Beyond.

Snohomish County is a vacation hotspot — for Seattleites

People seeking relative peace and quiet are boosting the area’s third-biggest industry.

She’d go back to prison if it would erase her $7.6M debt

Christine Hendrickson stole expensive software from Microsoft. She’ll never pay off the restitution.

Where’s the next Sea-Tac? Aviation here is expected to soar

A new study predicts demand for airline service in the Puget Sound region will double by 2050.

Mountain biking, disc golf mark seasons shift at Stevens

Widely known for its winter wonderland, summer at Stevens Pass offers other opportunities.

State Senate to conduct inquiry into public comments by Mona Das

District 47 senator claimed racism, sexism present at Democratic caucus meetings

SeaTac man guilty of 1987 murders solved with DNA technique

In an unprecedented trial, a jury convicted William Talbott in the slayings of a young Canadian couple.