Jenny Durkan Claims Victory, Will Become Mayor of Seattle Later This Month

A second ballot drop widened her lead and pushed opponent Cary Moon to concede.

It’s official. Former U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan will be the next mayor of Seattle following the concession of her general election opponent Cary Moon on Wednesday afternoon.

Moon, an urban planner, refused to quit last night, despite the fact that Durkan boasted a 20-point lead with 61 percent of the votes counted in the initial ballot drop. But a new batch of votes tallied on Wednesday afternoon widened Durkan’s path to victory.

“I ran for Mayor because I felt an immense duty and responsibility to ensure Seattle—our beautiful, vibrant, diverse city—works for everyone,” Moon said in a press release announcing her concession.

“We all belong here, and deserve a voice in shaping our city’s future. I know you won’t stop fighting for what you believe is right, and I won’t stop fighting either,” Moon concluded in her statement to supporters.

Her opponent’s advantages weren’t lost on Moon, who said in a statement that “Despite being outspent 3:1, we ran a strong, transparent, and honest campaign about vision and solutions. We drove the conversation around housing affordability, real estate speculation, municipal broadband, and wealth inequality.”

Durkan is charged with running the city during a time of rapid growth, vast income disparities, and a surging homelessness crisis. “The hard work of delivering progress starts today,” Durkan said in a statement following Moon’s concession. “Our city will—and must—come together around the solutions to address the urgent issues facing our city from homelessness to affordability to addressing systemic inequities.”

Durkan will take office on November 28, rather than in January, since Murray resigned amid sexual abuse allegations.

“I want to congratulate Cary Moon on the strong race that she’s run and the ideas she brought to the table. In nearly 100 debates and forums, I saw firsthand her love for our city and her commitment to compassionately address the toughest challenges facing Seattle,” Durkan said in her statement. “Over the next few weeks, I look forward to working closely with Mayor Burgess and the City Council as well as city officials and workers to ensure a smooth transition.”

mhellmann@seattleweekly.com

More in News & Comment

Most of the tenants at show cause hearings have fallen behind on rent, said Housing Justice Project Managing Attorney Edmund Witter. Photo by Melissa Hellmann
New Report Details Seattle’s Eviction Trends

Analysis of 2017 county records and interviews show that nearly 90 percent of evicted tenants experienced homelessness

Daron Morris Suspends Campaign for King County Prosecutor

After running as a reformer, medical issues are preventing Morris from finishing the race.

Democratic incumbent Rep. Adam Smith of Washington’s 9th Congressional District (right) and challenger Sarah Smith discuss the issues facing the district during a forum the Mirror hosted on Sept. 19. Andy Hobbs/staff photo
Smith vs. Smith: Two Democrats Clash in 9th Congressional District Forum

Democratic socialist Sarah Smith seeks ‘bold new progressive vision’ in bid to replace incumbent Adam Smith.

Teen Immigrants in Washington Programs Claim Sexual Assault and Rape

Police reports from federally-funded facilities in Renton and Fife call the minors’ safety into question.

It’s Official: Safeco Field Will Get $135 Million in Taxpayer Funds

Critical King County Councilmembers call plan “a fleecing” and “irresponsible.”

The Westin Seattle workers represented by Unite Here Local 8 gather at Gethsemane Lutheran Church after voting to strike on Sep. 14. Photo by Abby Lawlor
Hotel Workers Vote to Authorize Strike

The Westin Seattle employees will picket to demand higher wages from Marriott International.

King County Moves to Expand Pre-Booking Diversion Program

Three cities could get money to link low-level drug offenders to services and keep them out of jail.

Immigrant Youth Vulnerable to Abuse in Centers

Federally-funded facilities struggle to maintain health and safety of minors stuck in limbo

Most Read