Inslee forms state task force to address policing and racial justice

24 members includes families who have lost loved ones; police officials

A new statewide task force will provide recommendations for legislation on independent investigations involving police use of force.

The 24 members were named on Monday by Gov. Jay Inslee.

The governor’s task force is a part of a coordinated effort with legislators to provide a comprehensive set of reforms, according to a news release from the governor’s office. Task force members will provide insight and feedback, review Initiative 940 structure and investigative protocol, other independent investigation models and provide input that will help inform legislation for the upcoming legislative session.

The task force includes many residents and families who have lost loved ones.

“We must listen to the voices of impacted communities and families to hear their experiences with policing,” Inslee said in the news release. “This work will inform legislation and help chart a path towards addressing some of these systemic and extremely harmful practices and policies that have impacted communities of color for generations.”

The work of the task force will join with the efforts of the Legislature. The task force will have its first meeting in early July and will meet regularly into the fall.

Task force members

Emma Catague, Community Police Commission, and Filipino Community Center, Seattle

Jordan Chaney, owner, Poet Jordan, Benton and Franklin Counties

Livio De La Cruz, board member, Black Lives Matter Seattle-King County

Chris Jordan, Fab-5, Tacoma

Monisha Harrell, chair, Equal Rights Washington, Seattle

Jay Hollingsworth, John T. Williams Organizing Committee, Seattle

Sanetta Hunter, community advocate, Federal Way

Katrina Johnson, Charleena Lyles’ cousin and family spokesperson; Families Are The Frontline, Seattle

Reverend Walter J. Kendricks, Morning Star Baptist Church; commissioner, Washington State Commission on African American Affairs, Spokane

Teri Rogers Kemp, attorney, Seattle

Ben Krauss, PhD., principal, Adaptive Training Solutions, Spokane

Darrell Lowe, chief, Redmond Police Department

Nina Martinez, board chair, Latino Civic Alliance, King County

Brian Moreno, commissioner, Washington State Commission on Hispanic Affairs, Pasco

Kimberly Mosolf, Disability Rights Washington, Seattle

Tyus Reed, Spanaway

Tim Reynon, Puyallup Tribal Council Member

Eric Ritchey, Whatcom County Prosecuting Attorney

Puao Savusa, City of Seattle Office of Police Accountability

James Schrimpsher, chief, Algona Police Department; Vice President of Washington State Fraternal Order of Police

Andre Taylor, founder/executive director, Not This Time, Seattle

Teresa Taylor, executive director, Washington Council of Police and Sheriffs

Spike Unruh, president, Washington State Patrol Troopers Association

Waldo Waldron-Ramsey, NAACP, Seattle


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