He might be the youngest city council member in the state

Jordan Sears, 19, has been appointed to fill a vacancy in Gold Bar. He’s not new to local politics.

Jordan Sears (Contributed photo)

Jordan Sears (Contributed photo)

GOLD BAR — Jordan Sears’ desire to serve in public office has led him to become the newest member of the Gold Bar City Council.

And at age 19, he might be the youngest city council member in the state.

Sears was appointed March 5 to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Brian Diaz following his arrest on charges of possession of child pornography and methamphetamine. Sears’ term runs through 2021.

“I felt I needed to step up to get involved,” he said. “I look forward to serving the people of Gold Bar for the next two years.”

Several residents in the town of 2,300 initially expressed interest in the post but only Sears came before the council for interviews. And he earned the appointment unanimously.

“The council was impressed with how earnestly he approached the job,” said Mayor Bill Clem. “We think he will do a great job.”

Sears is a Gold Bar native and graduate of Sultan High School, where as a senior he ran unsuccessfully for the School Board as a write-in candidate. He earned an associate of arts degree from Everett Community College through Running Start and today works as a service representative for a financial institution in Kirkland.

Earlier this year he said he started contemplating whether to run for City Council. When Diaz resigned he figured he’d throw his hat in the ring.

As a new councilman, he said he doesn’t have a big agenda though he does want to work on easing traffic problems.

And he hopes to be a representative voice for the community’s young adults.

Jordan Sears in 2017, when he was a write-in candidate for school board. (Contributed photo)

Jordan Sears in 2017, when he was a write-in candidate for school board. (Contributed photo)

“I think I can bring a unique perspective to the City Council and show them that we are active and we are involved,” he said.

Sears joins an emerging crop of young political partisans in the county.

Snohomish County Councilman Nate Nehring was 22 when he was elected in 2017. The first-term Republican will turn 24 later this month.

Sultan Councilman Russell Wiita was 20 years old when he filed to run for office in 2015. Wiita, now 24, works for Nehring in county government and is active in Republican Party politics.

And state Rep. Jared Mead, D-Mill Creek, at 27 is the youngest in the county’s delegation in the Legislature.

Sears, who has been engaged in Democratic Party politics, said he understands he must keep clear boundaries between the duties and responsibilities of his nonpartisan City Council position and any partisan pursuits.

It will require some effort, Wiita said

“I was a Republican activist but in the elected position you have to ground yourself and work on community issues,” he said. “It is certainly a transition.”

It is one that Sears said he’s looking forward to undertaking on behalf of his community.

“I want open and honest government,” he said. “I want people to feel positive about Gold Bar.”

Jerry Cornfield: 360-352-8623; jcornfield@herald net.com. Twitter: @dospueblos

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