COVID-19 — What you need to know today

Coronavirus pandemic continues worldwide. How is it impacting King County today?

3:55 p.m.

Public Health King County & Seattle reported more cases of COVID-19 and related deaths Saturday afternoon.

There are now 355 cases in King County, up 60 since Friday, and 35 cases, three more than Friday.

The reported deaths include;

  • A woman in her 70s, died at Swedish First Hill on March 12.
  • A man in his 80s, a resident of Life Care Center, hospitalized at EvergreenHealth, died on March 12.
  • A man in his 80s, a resident of Life Care Center, died at Overlake Medical Center on March 8.

Public Health also release guidelines for any gatherings with less than 250 people, including church congregations, meetings and parties.

In King County, an Order from the Health Officer on March 11 prohibited events of fewer than 250 people, unless event organizers take steps to minimize risk of COVID-19. For people who are planning events for fewer than 250 people, take all of these required steps so that your event can be held:

  • Precautions for older adults and those with underlying health conditions: Specifically encourage older adults age 60 and above and those with underlying health conditions not to attend the event. Note that CDC recommends that individuals at risk of severe illness should stay at home, avoiding gatherings or other situations of potential exposures, including travel, church attendance, and social events with 10 or more people.
  • Social distancing to prevent prolonged close contact. Event organizers should ensure that the event is organized in such way to avoid close contact between people. Close contact is being within 6 feet of someone for about 10 minutes or more.
  • Health screening for event organizers including employees and volunteers at event: Have a plan to health screen event organizers, employees and volunteers just prior to participating in the event.
  • CDC guidelines identify these key symptoms to watch for: fever, cough and shortness of breath.
  • In advance, organizers should discourage attendance for any person who has these symptoms. Throughout event, event organizers should require anyone who has the symptoms to leave.



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