File photo

File photo

County auditor finds agencies fall short on emergency services

The auditor’s office recommends clarifying responsibilities and accountability for effective planning.

The King County Auditor’s Office found many agencies were not fully prepared to keep operations going in an emergency, according to a report released on Jan. 13.

Across county agencies, Continuity Of Operations Plans (COOP Plans) were inconsistent in “quality” and “completeness,” making it hard to keep things running smoothly during emergencies, the report stated.

“King County’s geography puts it at risk for several types of major disasters such as earthquakes or volcanic eruptions,” said King County Auditor Kymber Waltmunson. “These emergencies would prompt massive changes to county operations to ensure that we are able to fulfill our obligations and respond to the crisis.”

The 2022 Emergency Preparedness audit reviewed continuity plans for all county departments and independent agencies and reviewed some challenges they previously identified in a 2016 audit. The latest audit found that several important issues had not been addressed by the county in the intervening five years.

The key takeaways from the audit include:

– Continuity of Operations Plans across county agencies were of inconsistent quality and completeness, which may present barriers to delivering services to the community in the event of emergencies.

– Although some agencies have strong planning practices, out-of-date continuity plans and incomplete training efforts could leave many agencies unprepared to continue services during an emergency.

– Not all agencies address how to communicate with staff prior to and during emergencies in their COOP Plans, increasing the risk that staff will not be aware of key information or responsibilities during an emergency.

– Agencies need to address the needs of personnel with disabilities in their COOP Plans.

“Many of the issues found in this audit are driven by a lack of assigned responsibilities for coordinating and implementing continuity plan practices, as we originally found in 2016,” the King County Auditor’s Office said in a written statement.

The King County Auditor’s Office recommended changes to processes at the Office of Emergency Management and updates to King County Code that clarify continuity plan requirements and a system for regular review of agency plans.

The audit also pointed out the King County Executive structure, in which the Office of Emergency Management does not report directly to the executive as they do in other county executive structures in comparable counties.

“Despite the shortcomings found in the report, the Auditor’s Office also reported that many agencies had done a great deal of work to update emergency plans throughout the course of the pandemic,” The auditor’s office wrote in a statement. “Many agencies excelled in specific areas of continuity plans, and Public Health has continued to innovate its engagement with communities to address health inequities amid a pandemic that has brought heavy workloads, staffing limitations and other challenges.”


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@seattleweekly.com.

More in News & Comment

Monkeypox virus. Photo courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control.
Public health officials confirm case of monkeypox in King County

Health officials say the positive case does not pose a significant risk to public health

Patti Cole-Tindall (Courtesy of King County)
Patti Cole-Tindall is officially confirmed as the new King County Sheriff

After serving as the interim sheriff since January, the King County Council… Continue reading

World War II veterans in Auburn, Wash. File photo
Washington ranks 7th among states for number of World War II veterans

12,364 WWII veterans are living in the state, with a total population of 517,912 military veterans.

Photo of promotional recruitment banner used by Auburn Police Department at Petpalooza. The banner features Auburn Police Officer Jeff Nelson, who is awaiting trial for the 2019 murder and assault of Jesse Sarey. Photo courtesy of Jeff Trimble
Auburn police use photo of embattled officer on recruitment banner

Families of people killed by Jeffrey Nelson, who’s awaiting trial for murder, speak out over use of his photo at Petpalooza.

T
Use your King County library card to explore the outdoors

KCLS cardholders can check out a Discover Pass for two weeks to explore public lands.

Monkeypox virus. Photo courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control.
King County identifies first presumptive monkeypox case

The illness is not as easily transmitted compared to COVID-19, according to health officer.

This screenshot from Auburn Police Department bodycam footage shows an officer about to fire his weapon and kill dog on May 13, 2022.
Auburn police shoot dog, and owner claims it wasn’t justified

See videos of attack as well as bodycam footage of officer firing at dog.

File photo.
King County Council approves creation of Cannabis Safety Taskforce amid rash of dispensary robberies

The multi-agency task force will cooperate to find ways to improve safety in the cash-only industry.

Most Read