Photo courtesy of King County Medic One

Photo courtesy of King County Medic One

4 King County paramedics quarantined after COVID-19 exposure

Two paramedic interns, two South King County primary response employees are asymptomatic, according to union executives.

Four King County Medic One paramedics have been placed in quarantine due to exposure to the novel coronavirus, the organization shared on March 11.

Two of the quarantined members were working on a primary response 911 unit in South King County, and the other two members are paramedic interns at the Michael K Copass Paramedic Training Program at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, according to King County Paramedics IAFF Local 2595 secretary Kyle Waterman.

The two paramedic interns work on Seattle Fire Department Medic Units until they are released from training, Waterman shared. King County paramedics move to different stations frequently for shifts.

King County paramedics’ service area extends the entirety south of Seattle and Bellevue’s response area to the Pierce County line.

“Our members are currently quarantined at home, and as of this morning asymptomatic,” Waterman stated in an email on Thursday morning. “Even though our members were exposed to a COVID-19 patient, doesn’t definitively mean they will contract COVID-19.”

Details on specific location of the suspected exposure have not yet been released.

Union board executives continue to speak with the quarantined members by phone daily to ensure needs are being met and to regularly inquire about symptoms, Waterman noted.

“We are confident our membership will do whatever it takes to ensure seamless and uninterrupted Advanced Life Support service to the citizens of King County,” Waterman stated. “Our members are dedicated men and woman who care deeply about the communities they serve and are eager to continue the same service the citizens of King County have come to expect.”

Any member of the public calling 911 should disclose to the call receiver if they are experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19, even if those symptoms are not the primary reason for the initial 911 call.

“We ask for privacy for our members affected and thank the public for the support and well wishes.”


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@seattleweekly.com.

More in News & Comment

File photo
Puget Sound renters will need housing assistance
Puget Sound renters will need housing assistance

Nonprofits, activists are expecting greater need as workers are laid off.

Freshwater variety of kokanee salmon from Lake Sammamish. File photo
Encouraging numbers for kokanee salmon spawn count

Lake Sammamish kokanee aren’t out of the woods by any stretch, but… Continue reading

In this file photo, Tayshon Cottrell dons his graduation cap and gown, along with a face mask reading: “Wear it! Save America” at Todd Beamer High School’s virtual graduation walk recording on May 20, 2020, in Federal Way. Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing
Law gives Washington high school seniors leeway to graduate

Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill that can waive some requirements for students who were on track before the pandemic.

File photo
Study shows Washingtonians exceeded ‘heavy drinking’ threshold in 2020

The survey suggests Washingtonians drank more than 17 alcoholic beverages a week on average.

Mercer Island School District first-graders returned to in-person classes on Jan. 19, 2021. Here, Northwood Elementary School students head into the building. Photo courtesy of the Mercer Island School District
Governor: Educators are now eligible for coronavirus vaccine

“This should give educators more confidence,” Jay Inslee said. Other frontline workers could soon be next.

Malden, after a wildfire burned down 80% of the town’s buildings in Eastern Washington. Courtesy photo
DNR commissioner seeks $125 million to fight wildfires

In Washington state last September, some 600,000 acres burned within 72 hours.

Washington State Supreme Court Justices (back row, L-R) Raquel Montoya-Lewis, Sheryl Gordon McCloud, Mary I. Yu, G. Helen Whitener, (front row, L-R) Susan Owens, Charles W. Johnson, Steven C. Gonzalez, Barbara A. Madsen and Debra L. Stephens.
Justices strike down Washington state drug possession law

Police must stop arresting people for simple possession.

In Phase 2 of Gov. Jay Inslee’s reopening plan, which was announced Jan. 28, restaurants can reopen at a maximum 25% capacity and a limit of six people per table. Inslee recently announced all counties will be staying in Phase 2 of the state’s reopening plan for the next several weeks. Pictured: People enjoy outdoor dining last summer in downtown Kent. Courtesy photo
Inslee: All of Washington to stay in Phase 2 for a few weeks

The governor issued a weekslong pause on regions moving backward, but has yet to outline a Phase 3.

Most Read