Parker Sawyers and Tika Sumpter star in a film about the Obamas’ first date. Courtesy Miramax

Selections for the Fourth Week of the Seattle International Film Festival

Young Obama in love, Viggo Mortensen’s post-hippie fantasy, and more.

Sand Storm From Israel, a somber story of arranged marriages within a Bedouin village, a scenario rooted in the modern world despite the ancient customs on display. Stirringly acted, with a haunting final shot. Director Elite Zexer (it’s her feature debut) will attend. June 8, 9:30 p.m., Uptown; June 9, 8:30 p.m., Kirkland Performance Center

Captain Fantastic Viggo Mortensen does his best—and that’s quite a lot—to supply a solid center for this post-hippie fantasy about an off-the-grid family forced to re-engage with the world. Various woodsy Washington locations provide the setting for a crowd-pleasing fable. June 12, 2:30 p.m., Uptown; also screens at an interview/tribute honoring Mortensen, June 11 at 1:30 p.m., Egyptian)

Up for Love The Oscar-winning star of The Artist, Jean Dujardin, undergoes a digital makeover as a romance-minded fellow who stands 4´6˝. Dujardin’s a great physical actor, even when the movie opts for pathos over comedy. June 10, 8:30 p.m., Kirkland; June 11, 6:30 p.m., Egyptian; June 12, noon, Uptown

Southside With You A first date between two Chicagoans, done in talky style—but the twist is that the people are named Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson, current residents of the White House. The film is smart, but how would it play if we didn’t know what destiny had in store for these folks? But we do know, and that makes all the difference. Director Richard Tanne will attend. June 11, 7 p.m., Uptown; June 12, 7 p.m., Egyptian

News From Planet Mars The wicked mind of director Dominik Moll (Lemming) is loose in this tale of a divorced father whose careful existence begins to implode. The movie’s got some great moments of everyday weirdness, although it doesn’t take flight as Moll’s previous films did. June 11, 9:30 p.m., Pacific Place; June 12, 8:30 p.m., Kirkland

Last Cab to Darwin Veteran Australian actor Michael Caton brings just enough ornery attitude to this tale of a dying man road-tripping across the outback in order to participate in a death-with-dignity program. A genial mood prevails, as the Aussies know how to make road movies. June 12, 7:30 p.m., Uptown

film@seattleweekly.com

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