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In this week's edition of Tabletop Wrestling , Hanna Raskin and Mike Seely tackle the contentious topic of appropriate Met Grill dress.

Hanna Raskin

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Is it Cool to Wear a Football Jersey to the Met?

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bradleygee
In this week's edition of Tabletop Wrestling, Hanna Raskin and Mike Seely tackle the contentious topic of appropriate Met Grill dress.

Hanna Raskin says it's fine for patrons to show up in Seahawks jerseys.

Of all the restaurant trends to take hold during my lifetime, the near-ubiquitous acceptance of casual dress in fine dining rooms is among the most annoying. A restaurant has a very different feel when half of its patrons are wearing t-shirts and jeans. Granted, I'm inclined to dress up at the slightest provocation - my standard work uniform is a skirt and high heels, even though I typically don't interact with anyone during the day - but I'm sure even yoga pant devotees would agree that restaurants feel more special when its guests aren't wearing outfits appropriate for cleaning out the garage.

So I should probably hate the idea of Seahawks fans showing up at Met Grill in their jerseys. But it's the rare dress code deviation that doesn't bother me one bit.

Like sports, jersey fashion is chockablock with rules. It's uncouth to wear a jersey with your own name on it, and wearing a jersey during the off-season is just dumb. What's allowable is wearing a football jersey to the football stadium - and to a celebratory dinner afterward.

Here's why: Even the fanciest restaurants make attire exceptions for folks in uniform, and a proper jersey (which is typically as costly as a nice shirt, pants and tie) is the ultimate fan uniform on game day. And while football fans may not be as critical to a city's well-being as its firefighters, police officers and military members, they help to elevate and solidify community pride. On a few nights every year, it's perfectly appropriate to support Seattle's restaurants and its football team too.

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Mike Seely draws the line at football jerseys.

Of all the restaurant trends to take hold during my lifetime, the near-ubiquitous acceptance of casual dress in fine dining rooms is among the most annoying. A restaurant has a very different feel when half of its patrons are wearing t-shirts and jeans. I'm sure even yoga pant devotees would agree that restaurants feel more special when its guests aren't wearing outfits appropriate for cleaning out the garage.

So I should probably hate the idea of Seahawk fans showing up at Met Grill in their jerseys. And, unlike Hanna, I do; if the Met is going to allow its patrons to wear jerseys, ballcaps, and sweats, it might as well let dogs sit tableside and serve them leftover porterhouse morsels.

What's more, while I am the proud owner of a rare Ansu Sesay Sonic jersey (so rare I had to custom-order it from the team's front office) that I sometimes wear while playing pickup hoops, adults wearing the jerseys of specific athletes is lame in general. Feel free to don team garb if you're a fan, but by wearing one guy's jersey, you give the impression that you either are that guy or want to fuck him. But if you were that guy, you'd be on the field/court, and if you were fucking him, you'd be in a luxury box.

Follow Voracious on Facebook & Twitter. Follow me at @hannaraskin

 
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