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The Truck: Bikelava; Locations can be found on their Facebook page .

The Fare: Baklava.

The Stop:

I have never thought much about baklava. Mostly,

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Bikelava: Pedal-powered Baklava

bikelava (Custom).JPG

The Truck: Bikelava; Locations can be found on their Facebook page.

The Fare: Baklava.

The Stop:

I have never thought much about baklava. Mostly, I know it as the sweet, dense pastry made of phyllo dough and nuts that comes free with my order of a gyro at the neighborhood store. I am generally too full to eat it and have been known to relinquish many of those triangular bombs in the work kitchen to the ravenous "office vultures" who swoop in on anything that appears even mildly edible.

But when a baklava business is born out of a bike, I can't help but take notice.

See also:

Six Strawberries, a Rad Popsicle Business on Wheels

My Picks for Seattle's Top 10 Food Trucks

Since this summer, Frosene Sacco and her old school blue Schwinn bike have been powering a baklava cart.

Sacco, a former pastry chef who has a full time gig teaching ESL, busts out her grandmother's baklava recipe at the Des Moines Farmers Market and other Seattle events.

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Why baklava and why a bike? As a second generation Greek, the baklava peddler enjoys recreating her family's recipe. Sacco notes baklava is not as easy as busting out chocolate chip cookies. In fact, it is a two day, labor-intensive process.

As for the bike part, that came naturally. The bubbly baker and her husband are avid cyclists, having completed the Cascade Bicycle Club's 200-mile Seattle to Portland ride four times. They were also inspired by the bicycle vendors they encountered during their travels in Southeast Asia.

I will probably not crave the $2.50 sweet treat on its own, but Bikelava is a welcome little addition to the Seattle bike and food scene.

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