Bachelorette.jpg
The girlfriends you do NOT want in your bridal party.
The Dinner: Caprese salad and a glass of chardonnay at Suite Lounge

The Movie: Bachelorette

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Bachelorette Brings on the Bitter Girlfriends and Blow That Bridesmaids Didn't

Bachelorette.jpg
The girlfriends you do NOT want in your bridal party.
The Dinner: Caprese salad and a glass of chardonnay at Suite Lounge

The Movie: Bachelorette at Lincoln Square Cinemas

The Screenplate: It's inevitable that Bachelorette draws comparisons to Bridesmaids because, well, it stars a lot of women involved in a wedding. But in actuality, Bachelorette is bitchier, crasser, and most certainly it doesn't leave you with that fuzzy feeling that best friends are always forever. In other words, it's a lot more realistic.

The dark comedy opens with Becky (played by the awesome Rebel Wilson, who was also in Bridesmaids) telling her "best friend" Regan (Kirsten Dunst) over brunch that she is engaged. Regan grits her teeth and gives an insincere "I'm so happy for you." After the meal, she calls the rest of their high school circle to share how aghast she is that the fat girl from their group is going to get hitched first. Gene (Lizzie Caplan) and Katie (Isla Fisher) are equally shocked. So shocked in fact, that Regan and Katie think it's a hilarious idea to try on Becky's wedding dress and post a photo on Facebook to show they can both fit into it at once. It, of course, rips. The rest of the film follows these awful selfish women--whom poor Becky is only too happy to have as bridesmaids--as they scramble to fix the dress, all while snorting as much coke and screaming at one another as much as possible.

They're the kind of women you might see at Bellevue's swanky Suite Lounge. Located in the lobby of Hyatt Regency Bellevue, it offers potent cocktails and small plates, ideal for coked-out girls with suppressed appetites. Much of the clientele resembles Regan, Gina, and Katie: women who were hot stuff in their 20s, but are starting to now veer into hot mess territory. Gina's ex-boyfriend (Adam Scott) says it best when he stops her from calling her coke dealer for more blow. "It's not cute anymore," he tells her.

Indeed it isn't. But who doesn't have a girlfriend who missed that memo? More often than not, we have friends we loathe as much as we love. And it's more likely we talk shit behind their backs than it is we dance with them at our wedding to a Wilson Phillips song. Female friendships can be complicated. Example: An overdose towards the end of the film leads to this exchange: "Shouldn't we get an ambulance?" "No. She does this every weekend." It's awful, yet strangely sweet when friends know and accept each others' flaws at that level.

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