Step Up to Rancho Bravo: A Cheap & Cheesy Night of Booty-Shaking

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Summit Entertainment
The Mob tries to Occupy Miami with the power of dance.
The Dinner : Taquitos at Rancho Bravo Tacos (1001 E. Pine St.)

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Step Up to Rancho Bravo: A Cheap & Cheesy Night of Booty-Shaking

  • Step Up to Rancho Bravo: A Cheap & Cheesy Night of Booty-Shaking

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    Picture 45.png
    Summit Entertainment
    The Mob tries to Occupy Miami with the power of dance.
    The Dinner: Taquitos at Rancho Bravo Tacos (1001 E. Pine St.)

    The Movie: Step Up Revolution at Regal Meridian 16 (1501 7th Ave.)

    The Screenplate: A phenomenon that began with the '80s classics Flashdance and Dirty Dancing has since morphed into a bastardized rom-com genre rife with hip-hop but bereft of substance. We have since been bombarded with a myriad of forgettable underdog stories featuring girls grinding in booty shorts and guys who let their chains hang low. Until, at last, the Step Up saga began. Step Up not only gave the world Channing Tatum, but also a film franchise so cheesy-yet-satisfying that it has arguably become the decade's most embarrassing guilty pleasure—besides Twilight. Step Up Revolution, the debacle's fourth unconnected installment, panders to our deepest and most humiliating obsessions—lovers from opposite sides of the wealth gap, 3D, shirtless men with backward hats—and is, perhaps, the guiltiest episode of all.

    Whilst working as a full-time waiter at a luxurious beach resort, Sean (Ryan Guzman) is the lead dancer and organizer of The Mob, a group of dancers and artists that have the moves, the finances and the availability necessary to flash mob any Miami location at any given moment. After dropping out of college, new girl Emily Anderson (Kathryn McCormick of "So You Think You Can Dance") begrudgingly moves into her father's resort with hopes of becoming a professional dancer, a career of which daddy (Peter Gallagher) strongly disapproves. Sean takes Emily under his wing after an itchy and sexy—but mostly itchy—dance-off in the sand. When Mr. Anderson buys up the Mob's favorite neighborhood to build an ostentatious development, Emily helps the Mob gear up to defeat the one percent with awesome dance moves.

    So it's not going to win any awards. The plot is generic and the acting is contrived. Still, it's safe to say that no one pays to watch the Step Up movies because they are high-quality cinematic feats. People go because they want experience the shameful rush inspired by the glorious combination of synchronized booty-shaking and laughable dialogue. Gaping at scantily clad three-dimensional dancers as they effortlessly pop, lock and drop it on the hoods of pimped-out cars for 10 minutes makes it easy to overlook most of the movie's plunging pitfalls. Step Up Revolution proves that any plot, no matter how dismal, can be saved by the inclusion of seven well-choreographed dance numbers.

    As far as the Seattle food scene is concerned, Rancho Bravo Tacos is one of the city's most distinguished guilty pleasures. It is a restaurant ideal for customers with the munchies, drunk passersby, taco enthusiasts and broke eaters. Certainly not visited for its divey and fluorescent atmosphere, the only things that matter at Rancho Bravo are the satisfying taste of its greasy Mexican food and the relief it brings every wallet. Just as Step Up appeals to people who enjoy cheap and cheesy entertainment, Rancho Bravo appeals to people who enjoy cheap, and sometimes cheesy, food.

    If Step Up Revolution were a food, it would be a taquito from Rancho Bravo, which, I'm not ashamed to say, is damn good despite its flaws. "Las floutas" come smothered by a veil of lettuce, tomato and cotija cheese that, like Step Up's impressive technical elements, serves to make the rest of the chicken-stuffed dish seem healthier than it really is. With crunchy ends and a slightly soggy middle section, the beginning and end of the taquito are its best parts, just as the first and last dance scenes of Step Up apologize for the film's soft middle.

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