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Last week Hanna and Chris looked into what makes a great steakhouse happy hour , but armed with an occasion to celebrate and a Monday

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Metropolitan Grill Mans up Monday

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Last week Hanna and Chris looked into what makes a great steakhouse happy hour, but armed with an occasion to celebrate and a Monday night on which to do it, I looked into what makes a great steakhouse. I chose one where I had enjoyed the more frugal meals--happy hour and lunch--so I knew going in a little bit about what I'd be in for. What makes a steak house great is, of course, the steak, but it's also so much of what steak stands for and what steakhouses represent: formality in a traditional, masculine, powerful way.

There's something inherently sexy about the decor of a steakhouse, and the Metropolitan Grill creates it with the thick wood trim on every surface and the high, dark-green booths that keep your conversation to yourself. The individual lights on your table, which imply everything is under your control. It is, in a way. Steak is a dish that is all about control. Control the fat in your meat by ordering the right cut, control the cooking by ordering it rare or well-done, control the side dish, with your choice from the long list (though none of the ones we tried was any great shakes, especially compared to the excellent meat).

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The meat was amazing. Great steak can be made at home, but superlative flavor like this requires a steakhouse. The true taste of beef, which is so lacking in grocery store meat these days, shouted out from the plate, a result of not just good sourcing, but of the dry-age process. And, as should be expected, the steak was cooked exactly as we requested.

While I sipped on a big, bold red wine (to match the food and the environment), I watched the table next to us receive their entrees. The child got pasta with cheese sauce and the lady a small plate of meat medallions. The gentlemen, however, had a plate twice the size of theirs, and even that was having difficulty containing the platter-sized monstrosity of meat. The bone, about the size of my forearm, stuck out, encroaching on the child's pasta plate across from him. This is what steakhouses are about: the grandiose, the big power, and the big meat.

Follow Voracious on Facebook & Twitter. Find more from Naomi Bishop on her blog, The GastroGnome, or on Twitter.

 
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