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Fisher Flour will sell over one million scones during this year's edition of the Puyallup Fair , but there's more to eat at the fair

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New at the Puyallup Fair: Deep-Fried Kool-Aid

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Fisher Flour will sell over one million scones during this year's edition of the Puyallup Fair, but there's more to eat at the fair than pastry. This week, Voracious spotlights four new-to-the-fair foods worth checking out should the scone lines grow unbearably long.

The problem with fried beer--besides the disconcertingly hot spurt of sour beer at the heart of each salty serving--is that minors can't eat it. Since most fair vendors would prefer not to prune their customer base or deal with liquor licenses, the deep-frying crowd no doubt cheered the arrival of fried Kool-Aid this summer.

I still haven't tasted deep-fried Kool-Aid, since Totally Fried, the Puyallup Fair's lone vendor of questionable fried items, couldn't get its fryer to work when I visited the fair on its first day. But tens of thousands of Americans have tried the poppers since inventor Charlie Boghosian introduced them at the San Diego County Fair earlier this year.

Boghosian, credited with being the first man to deep-fry a Thin Mint, has compared the popular pink balls to doughnut holes, with sugar powder instead of fruit at the center.

"It starts off tart and tangy, and then finishes really sweet... I love this stuff," a San Diego County Fair attendee told the San Diego Union Tribune.

Excitement over fried Kool-Aid dismayed serious epicureans: "If fried KoolAid balls are a hot treat @the County Fair it seems food critics R redundant, crying in the wilderness," Gael Greene grumbled on Twitter.

Alice Laussade, who chronicles fried food at the State Fair of Texas for our sister paper, the Dallas Observer, found another defect in the snack:

"Pssht. Maybe Deep Fried Vodka Kool Aid," she tweeted.

Follow Voracious on Facebook & Twitter. Follow me at @hannaraskin

 
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