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Seattle Weekly readers are a heavy-eating and drinking bunch, but a number of them set down their forks and steins to record their choices for

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Best of Seattle: Readers' Favorite Barbecue

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Seattle Weekly readers are a heavy-eating and drinking bunch, but a number of them set down their forks and steins to record their choices for the city's best spots for corned beef, coffee, and curry--among other critical edibles. Over the coming weeks, we'll be sharing their selections on Voracious. And while the cliché that "if you don't vote, you can't complain" may hold true elsewhere, we welcome your rants about oversights and misjudgments in the comments section below.

Medals are awarded based on vote tallies, and the readers' decisions are final. Until next year.

GOLD: Jones Barbeque Best of Seattle Readers' Choice Winner

Jones Barbeque, which this summer celebrated the opening of its third location, was a Best of Seattle champ from 2004-2008. Readers decided to bestow the honor again this year, blessing the mini-chain's generously sauced smoked meat with their utmost approval. Jones takes a pan-Southern approach to 'cue, serving pork ribs, chopped pork, and beef brisket, all smothered in a sweet, tomato-based sauce that might have Mississippian antecedents. For faithful fans, the sauce is sold by the jar.

SILVER: RoRo BBQ & Grill

In a nod to Seattle eating habits, RoRo serves a mean Portobello sandwich and an array of vegan sides, but displaced Southerners flock to this Wallingford restaurant for its sweet tea, which is sufficiently sugary for Dixified palates. RoRo isn't overly solemn about smoked meat: For its popular barbecue sundae, the restaurant layers meat, beans, and slaw in a cup and sticks a corn muffin on top.

BRONZE: Pecos Pit BBQ

Since every Seattle eater who cares about barbecue has pointed me to Pecos Pit, I'm guessing its fans were too busy eating shredded pork sandwiches to file their Best Of ballots. Pecos Pit wins authenticity points for keeping classic shack hours--weekdays only, and closing time comes at 4 p.m.--and a working woodpile. Pecos' meat is smoky, and its sauce is locally renowned for its sting.

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