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Nearly 400 people have pledged to bake a pie on July 5 because of a casual Twitter conversation that turned to the topic of pie-crust

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Seattle Blogger Invites Bakers to Overcome Their Pie-Crust Fears

pierack.jpg
Nearly 400 people have pledged to bake a pie on July 5 because of a casual Twitter conversation that turned to the topic of pie-crust phobia.

"People are so afraid to make a pie crust that they're denying their families pie," recounts Seattle's Shauna Ahern, the cookbook author who blogs as Gluten-Free Girl.

Ahern responded to the sad state of pie affairs by declaring a virtual pie social on July 5. She's asking anyone with an oven to bake a pie and post its photo on her Pie Party Facebook page. Aspiring bakers without Facebook accounts can send their pictures to social media-equipped friends, Ahern says.

"It's for anyone and everyone," Ahern says. "Everyone should make pie!"

Ahern speculates that the current food obsession has dissuaded amateurs from making pies.

"The glossy magazines all show perfect pies," says Ahern, who wishes home bakers wouldn't compare themselves to Martha Stewart. At the International Association of Culinary Professionals conference in Austin earlier this year, Ahern discovered Nancie McDermott, author of Southern Pies, feels the same way.

"She's the pie queen," Ahern says. "She was like 'I'm so tired of this. Just get Pillsbury pie shells from the freezer.'"

Many of the people who've committed to make pie are members of the gluten-free community. Ahern points out gluten-free crusts are even easier to make than pie crusts with gluten because bakers "don't have to worry about overworking the crust."

Ahern hasn't yet decided what kind of pie she'll make for the Pie Party. It's too early for peaches, but she's considering a cherry almond-paste pie, depending upon what she finds at the market.

"The whole point is to just make pie," she says.

Follow Voracious on Facebook & Twitter. Follow me at @hannaraskin

 
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