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Most amateur food photographers take up the hobby because they have a "lust for food"--not because they're obsessed with light levels and lenses, says New

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New York Times Food Photographer Offers Seattle Workshops

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Most amateur food photographers take up the hobby because they have a "lust for food"--not because they're obsessed with light levels and lenses, says New York Times' dining-section contributor Andrew Scrivani.

Scrivani will be in town next week for a pair of corrective workshops intended to give attendees a grounding in technical camera skills. The four-hour class will cover equipment selection, lighting, and the dilemma of "ugly food."

"There are certain times where you get a dessert or a doughnut," Scrivani says. "But you don't always get that. Sometimes it's a pile of spinach."

Scrivani advises his students to "go off-grid and make it like art" when confronted with unappetizing food or inadequate lighting. "It doesn't have to be beautiful," Scrivani says. "It can be cool and funky."

According to Scrivani, many food lovers who want to capture meals for their blogs or personal digital scrapbooks are often stymied by a weak grasp of photography fundamentals. "Some situations are really challenging for people who don't understand photography first," he says. "Once they understand the math of the camera, they can develop a style."

Still, Scrivani says caring about food is as critical as comprehending apertures. "If you have a general appreciation of food, making beautiful pictures is not a far reach," he says.

The $150 workshop will be held on June 7 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m., and repeated on June 8 at the same time. To register, PayPal the fee to Scrivani at sundaysauce@gmail.com.

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