Peyrassol_web2.jpg
Siiri Sampson 2011
Eggs, Beecher,s flagship cheese, prosciutto, and truffle oil: A better combination doesn't exist.
Renton has had quite a few eateries pop up

"/>

Fairly Fine French Fare at Peyrassol

Peyrassol_web2.jpg
Siiri Sampson 2011
Eggs, Beecher,s flagship cheese, prosciutto, and truffle oil: A better combination doesn't exist.
Renton has had quite a few eateries pop up in The Landing over the past few years that are actually worth trying out. As contrived as the shopping center may be--an odd set of seemingly concentric circles that are tangentially adjoined to the existing infrastructure--having a handful of various cuisines all within eyeshot of each other is actually kind of nice. What most Eastsiders may not know, however, is that there's another complex on the rise, looking to give The Landing some competition. Just up the road, a stone's throw from a Boeing hangar and right on the waterfront by Coulon Park, sit the Southport buildings. And tucked away, like a little secret for locals' eyes only, is Peyrassol (1083 Lake Washington Blvd.).

Peyrassol has done a good job of turning what should be an office space (complete with a generic panel-drop ceiling) into a bright yet cozy space with a bit of character. While the front of the house functions like a coffeehouse where folks can grab a latte and a premade sandwich from their cold case, the majority of space is dedicated to a more relaxed sit-down cafe.

Peyrassol is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner with a modest menu for each, including a handful of wine pairings they very vocally recommend you try. During a recent visit, it was clear the restaurant is suffering from growing pains due to some Seattle-centric publicity that apparently sent flocks of French-loving foodies and locals alike down to investigate. At a quarter past noon, they had already run out of their turkey sandwich ($6), the only white-meat lunch offering, as well as the mini-quiche ($5.75). That left patrons with two red-meat sandwich options, or the soup, salad, or pasta of the day, all meat-free.

To their credit, you could order from the "Lite & Breakfast" menu, which had the Oeufs Plats ($7)--a delicate and flavorful helping of two over-easy eggs atop Beecher's flagship and surrounded by a crispy prosciutto cup that protected onlookers from bogarting a bite. Of course this was more of a light bite, and not filling enough for a full meal.

Peyrassol_web1.jpg
Siiri Sampson 2011
With asparagus in season, there's nothing it can't add a little kick to.
The kitchen definitely has a knack for quintessential French flair, which was clear in the hearty lentil soup du jour ($5.50), but more so in the lemon asparagus penne ($9). Visible shavings of lemon zest lent a summery feel to the mildly filling dish, and the asparagus was the best of the season so far--thin, al dente, and sweet. The lightweight sauce was close to a beurre blanc and there was just the right amount slathered on, although it did separate a little toward the end. Overall this was the standout dish of the morning and midday menus, but could benefit from a protein add-in option.

The house salad with crisp romaine arrived a bit differently than imagined. The toasted pecans are actually chopped up so finely you might miss them, almost as if they were tossed in with the Dijon red-wine vinaigrette The dressing was bright, tangy, and just right, but the salad overall was underwhelming. Even though a salad of plain greens is traditionally French, this version could easily be more satisfying, and improved upon by the addition of any in-season tomato or cucumber.

On the whole, Peyrassol shows promise to become a staple for locals of the Eastside and south end this summer. French cuisine on the Renton waterfront will continue to be a welcome sight in those parts. Once the kitchen works out the few kinks and finds its niche in the fancier fare of the general area, their signature dish will likely emerge organically, solidifying Peyrassol as a well-known destination rather than a lucky find.

Follow Voracious on Twitter and Facebook.

 
comments powered by Disqus

Friends to Follow