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It's 4/21--a day late for serious stoner celebrations--but if you are so inclined, these recipes from The Cannabis Cookbook will work great

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Cannabutter Takes Your Baking to New Highs

pot brownies.jpg
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It's 4/21--a day late for serious stoner celebrations--but if you are so inclined, these recipes from The Cannabis Cookbook will work great any day of the year. The cannabutter can be used in place of regular butter in your favorite baked goods. It still leaves a lingering taste of pot, though . . . so go for something that you eat in two-three bites (brownies or cookies) instead of something like pie or pound cake.

The THC tincture can be used to make "Bloody Mary Janes," which may be the best drink name ever. For the most part, I wasn't a fan of the whacked-out recipe names in the The Cannabis Cookbook, but Bloody Mary Janes is awesome, man.

Read Part I for the review.

Cannabutter

1-2lb/0.5-1kg butter or ghee

2-3 oz/55-85g of finely ground/powdered cannabis

1. The butter is melted in a pan and several ounces of the powdered cannabis added. It is simmered and stirred for a few minutes until the butter turns a greenish color.

2. The butter is then strained through a very fine strainer, and remaining leafy material retained.

3. To really crank up the wow factor, step 1 can be repeated by heating fresh cannabis in the same butter.

4. When cool it can be frozen or refrigerated but water should be poured over it first to stop air getting to it. Cannabutter can be kept for a long time this way.

5. The left-over leafy material can be simmered in hot milk or vodka and sweetened with honey to make a tasty and powerful drink. Or it can be used in one of the recipes in this book.

Basic Tincture

¾ oz/22 g marijuana leaves and/or flowers (or resin, if that's all you have)

3 fl. oz/90ml alcohol (vodka or brandy--40-70% proof minimum)

1. The cannabis is ground down to make a powder. Grass is better than resin because it tends to be purer, and therefore it is easier to filter out the solid bits that remain after extraction.

2. The cannabis powder is soaked overnight in warm water. This removes any water-soluble impurities but not any of that precious THC.

3. The excess water is drained off and the cannabis placed in an airtight jar. The alcohol is poured over.

4. The mixture is kept in a cool, dark place for about 10 days and shaken daily. The it is filtered through a strainer or, if resin has been used, a coffee filter, to avoid the now-inert bits getting into the final drink. The filtering process should be repeated at least once--the more it is filtered, the more the tincture will be improved and strengthened.

5. The green/brown colored tincture should be stored somewhere dark and cold. Most of the THC will have been absorbed within a week, but connoisseurs tend to leave it for a year or more.

6. The cannabis tincture can be enjoyed neat or dissolved in a drink or in food.

(From The Cannabis Cookbook © 2007 Ivy Press Limited.)

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