Delicacy_BirdsNestSoup.jpg
Source: www.luxist.com
Do you tell your target before, or after they finish their soup, that those "tofu" bits were actually regurgitated bird phlegm?
If you

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The World's 6 Most Unromantic Foods

Delicacy_BirdsNestSoup.jpg
Source: www.luxist.com
Do you tell your target before, or after they finish their soup, that those "tofu" bits were actually regurgitated bird phlegm?
If you grew up in a country other than the U.S., chances are you have consumed some sort of "delicacy" your parents shoved on your plate under duress. But you look back on those memories and think, "I'm glad I tried that, it broadened my horizons" or "I will never eat that again, I'm still waking up with night sweats." Regardless, you'll probably make your kids eat the same delectable dish, to pass on the cultural heritage, and because misery loves company. However, if you were born and raised in the states, you have to travel pretty far to get your mitts on some of the following loathsome "foods." Grab your passport, a fork, and the Tums, it's gonna be a bumpy ride.

1. Casu Marzu. Directly translated as "rotten cheese." The Sardinians let a perfectly good wheel of pecorino turn into a bacteria and maggot heyday. Apparently the more maggots, the better? Good luck finding this on your next Italian getaway, though--it's officially illegal so you'll need to speak enough Italian to find a back-alley black-market to get your hands on the slimy, pungent formaggio.

Delicacy_maggotcheese.jpg
Credit: www.culinaryschools.org

2. Balut. The Philippines offers an inordinate amount of cultural delicacies only consumable by culinary Evel Knievels. But balut takes the cake for hardest to swallow. The hard-boiled fetal duck egg not only sounds sad and, well, crunchy, but it looks exactly like you think it will. Traditionally topped with a salt/chilis/vinegar mixture, the entire contents are consumed, save the egg white. Yep, that makes sense.

Delicacy_BalutSoup.jpg
Source: www.wikipedia.org

3. Cobra blood. Not only is this probably illegal in every country, but it's the craziest, messiest street food we've seen in a long time. What possesses a person to drink this? You're either executing a dare while backpacking across Asia with your roommate, or looking for stories to tell your grandkids some day.

Delicacy_Cobra Blood.jpg
Credit: David Cornish via www.dtinews.vn

4. Swiftlet Nest Soup. All over Asia, these nests made of birds saliva are sold for soup, tea, and medicinal comsumption. It's a hyper-expensive treat; one kilogram of the "Caviar of the East" can cost between $2,000 and $10,000. That's some pricey spit!

Delicacy_BirdsNestSoup.jpg
Source: www.luxist.com

5. Haggis. Haggis has a borderline-onomatopoeic name, doesn't it? The recipe is just as enticing as the sound. Simply chop up a sheep's liver, heart, and lungs and mix in onions, spices, and oatmeal (what?!). Pack it all into a sheep's stomach, tie off the ends, and boil for a few hours. Then watch as all your guests have unexpected emergencies and run out the door.

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Source: www.independenttraveler.com

6. Mole Cricket. You can find them on every continent except Antarctica, living in your fields, lawns, and golf courses. The two-inch pest finds renewed revelry in places like East Asia, where they fry 'em up and gulp 'em down. Just watch out for those little claws, they look pokey!

Delicacy_MoleCricket.jpg
Source: www.tripatlas.com

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