Snow-Cream-Recipe.jpg
I'll be honest--sometimes I miss living in the suburbs. It's not often, but there are times, including last night when the snow was coming down

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Stay Away From the Yellow Snow, and a Recipe From the Midwest

Snow-Cream-Recipe.jpg
I'll be honest--sometimes I miss living in the suburbs. It's not often, but there are times, including last night when the snow was coming down at a clip, when I longed for a backyard so I could run out, scoop up a handful, and make snow cream. Because I live in the city, though, I'm fairly wary of even considering eating any snowflake that's touched down.

When I mentioned to my boyfriend how much I miss snow cream, his response was less than heartening. I think "Ewww" was the exact phrase. I admit that a snowball covered in sugar, vanilla, and milk might not sound like the best idea these days, but that he'd never tried a bowl (even as a child) threw me for a loop. In the snowy Midwest, it's almost a rite of passage.

The general recipe for snow cream has old but untraceable roots, and includes mixing a dairy agent with a flavoring to create a mashup that resembles ice cream. These days, even Food Network's Paula Deen has a recipe for snow cream--though hers uses condensed milk for an extra fatty kick, because obviously she's trying to kill us.

Variations I found on the recipe include adding whipped cream, egg, gelatin, and coconut, or forgoing the "cream" route all together and sprinkling the snow with Kool-Aid for more of a slushy effect. I hope this next part goes without saying, but any snow that isn't pure white need not apply.

What say you, native Northwesterners? Have you ever tried snow cream?

 
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