fallingoffthebone.jpg
It's finger-lickin'...it's finger-lickin' good, y'all.
Sometimes a girl just wants a good piece of meat. Alas, satisfying one's needs can be a bit pricey. Cookbook

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Bone-Sucking Goodness in Falling Off the Bone

fallingoffthebone.jpg
It's finger-lickin'...it's finger-lickin' good, y'all.
Sometimes a girl just wants a good piece of meat. Alas, satisfying one's needs can be a bit pricey. Cookbook author Jean Anderson knows this and has an economical solution: Get yourself a bone. Innuendo aside, Anderson makes a good point. In her latest cookbook, Falling Off The Bone ($29.95, published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.), she suggests buying a roast or other large, untrimmed piece of meat. They are usually much cheaper than buying steaks, chops or other small cuts. To turn these hunks of meat into something delicious, all you need is a good recipe, a large pot and time.

Lately, a lot of cookbooks and recipes have been geared towards saving time. In Falling Off The Bone, Anderson says to forget about 30-minute meals or dinner in 20 minutes or less. Sometimes the best meals are ones that have stewed, bubbled or boiled for hours. With a large cut of meat - with or without the bone - and Anderson's guidance, you can turn a tough cut - with all its fat, gristle and cartilage - into something melt-in-your-mouth delicious.

The introduction of this book educates readers about various cuts of meat and how to make the right choice for a slow-cooked recipe. There are also recommendations for equipment and ingredients, as well as some shortcuts like using prepared broth in a pinch.

The chapters are divided into lamb, pork, veal, and beef. There are helpful diagrams, illustrating where the tough cuts are located on each beast, plus a a breakdown of how to use them best, (e.g. beef rump for pot roast; pig's feet for braises). Each chapter includes tips for storing, freezing and recycling leftovers, as well as advice on shopping for meat.

While the recipes are influenced from across the globe, they are adapted to American palates as well as what can be found easily in a supermarket. There are Old World favorites like Mulligan stew, Steak and Kidney Pie and Beef Bourguignon in addition to Albóndigas and Country-Fried Steak. There's even a recipe for this year's menu darling, lamb neck: Lamb Neck Slices in a Dill and Lemon Sauce, enriched with egg yolks.

Falling Off The Bone is a great book for anyone interested in more economical cooking or for someone wanting belly-filling, soul-warming recipes that won't break the bank.

Read Part II of Cooking the Books and a recipe from Falling Off The Bone.

 
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