Wieners and Losers: George's Sausage & Delicatessen

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The uncooked sausages with Remy, my family's personal "hot-dawg." Credit: Jaime Swindle

The first in our weekly blog reviews of Seattle sausages.

Sausage: I tried

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Wieners and Losers: George's Sausage & Delicatessen

  • Wieners and Losers: George's Sausage & Delicatessen

  • ">

    remy%20uncooked%20WEB.jpg

    The uncooked sausages with Remy, my family's personal "hot-dawg." Credit: Jaime Swindle

    The first in our weekly blog reviews of Seattle sausages.

    Sausage: I tried three kinds: uncooked white sausage, smoked kielbasa and a veal haddock.

    Butcher: George’s Sausage & Delicatessen, 907 Madison St., 622-1491, FIRST HILL. Open for a whopping 25 years, George’s is a Polish deli feeding the masses gigantic sandwiches, soups, and sausages during their lunch hour.

    Length and girth: All three varieties were fat and meaty. Both the uncooked white sausage and the smoked kielbasa were both folded over, making a round shape; if it was unwound, they would be roughly 14 inches long and 1.5 inches in diameter. The veal haddock was definitely packing some heat, with a more classic sausage shape, at roughly 9 inches in length and 1.75 inches in diameter.

    What’s in it? The smoked kielbasa and the uncooked white sausage have basically the same ingredients: ground pork, a delicate smattering of garlic, and salt, all in a natural sheep casing straight out of Denmark. The only difference is that the kielbasa is smoked and needs only to be heated up, whereas the white sausage is completely uncooked. The veal haddock contains a fine grind of veal with just enough spice to make it savory. It is wrapped up in the same natural sheep casing used for the kielbasa and white sausage.

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    With the delectable caramelized onions that I sizzled up. Credit: Jaime Swindle

    Cooking method: The butcher at George’s, Janet Lidzbarski, recommended that I either boil the sausages or cook ‘em up on a grill. I chose the grilling method, using a cast-iron grill pan on my gas stove. This added to the already smoky flavor of the smoked kielbasa and created some beautiful dark grill marks all over each sausage.

    How processed does it taste? (Scale of 0 to 10, with 1 being Kobe beef tartare and 10 being Oscar Meyer balogna) The most processed of the three sausages was the veal haddock, with a rating of 7. It was the most like your average hot dog, but with a smoother consistency and a bolder flavor. Then the smoked kielbasa and the uncooked white sausage tied at 5. You could really tell that all of these sausages were made in house. The casings, rather than being tough to chew, were easy to bite into while still retaining that nice pop.

    Crowd approval: Everyone who tried the sausages enjoyed the balance between the subtleties of the garlic, salt, and smoked elements and the fact that they’re a great vessel for stronger flavors. The texture of each was slightly different, with the smoked kielbasa having the heartiest qualities of manly meat and the veal haddock being as smooth as buttah.

    Ideal relish: Definitely the classic combination of sauerkraut and Dijon mustard is a staple with this type of sausage. However, I thought that the caramelized onions that I cooked up in the pan next to the grill added an extra element of sweetness that complemented the smoky and savory notes within the sausages themselves.

     
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