waterfall.jpg

Picnic spot: Waterfall Garden Park, 2nd & Main

Picnic supplies: My right hand, 8" Italian sub, normal potato chips, medium Fanta orange (total tab: $9.20),

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Walk It Out: Go Chasin' Waterfalls

waterfall.jpg

Picnic spot: Waterfall Garden Park, 2nd & Main

Picnic supplies: My right hand, 8" Italian sub, normal potato chips, medium Fanta orange (total tab: $9.20), Jimmy John's, 102 1st Ave., 521-9500, PIONEER SQUARE.

Walking it out: Jimmy John's used to have a simple, seemingly unimpeachable strategy: locate stores near college campuses, make sandwiches quickly and rather inexpensively, ring up, serve, repeat. No more -- Jimmy John's franchises have now invaded the interiors of major cities, at big-city prices (still affordable, mind you, but having to bust out a 10-spot for the aforementioned spread seems a bit much). But here's what I love about 'em: Whereas a six-inch sub is too little and a foot-long a tad gluttonous, eight inches is the perfect length for a sub in one sitting. And the speed with which JJ's crew cranks these sandies out is absolutely fucking amazing -- I had my Italian Club within 60 seconds of ordering. So with that price comes remarkable efficiency, at least.

You could say the same about United Parcel Service. Founded in 1907 right here in Seattle, UPS's drivers aren't just born with those tight asses and rippling calves, they develop them on the job, racing up stairs and through alleys like blue-collar superheroes. The whole show's enough to make a Seattle Weekly calendar editor swoon -- and maybe even get her honey hole pruned.

Turns out, UPS first hung its shingle at 2nd & Main, at a location that's now home to Waterfall Garden Park, which is essentially a cozy urban courtyard with lots of water rushing over a rock wall. Given its intimacy, it occasionally functions as an urban rest stop for those lacking permanent shelter, but during lunch, it serves as respite from the grind for Pioneer Square's relatively tie-free fleet of knowledge workers. The only real problem is the lack of a dress code that winks at history; park patrons should, after all, be required to wear brown.

 
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