I apologize in advance, because today's news have a decidedly preachy (even preachy-to-the-choir-y) slant. Actually, I'll list them in order of most lefty-do-gooder to least,

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The Food Section: September 12, 2007

All the news that's fit to eat. Sort of.

I apologize in advance, because today's news have a decidedly preachy (even preachy-to-the-choir-y) slant. Actually, I'll list them in order of most lefty-do-gooder to least, so you have time to recover from guilt/self-righteousness:

A Scolding from Russ Parsons: Food writer Michael Ruhlman tosses off that old "farmers markets sell elitist food" comment, and LA Times writer Russ Parsons, who just wrote a book on farmers markets, calls him an ignorant slut. Yes, merely reading this piece does qualify as an extra pat on the back, but you can memorize some of the Parsons' arguments for the next time you encounter an anti-farmers-market Seattleite. If there are any left.

New Rating System Helps Sell Healthier Food by AP (MSNBC): East Coast supermarket chain Hannaford Brothers labels its stock with a star system measuring healthfulness, and sales of the starred products go up.  (Thanks to Serious Eats for the link.)

Overweight? Blame Your Zip Code by Jennifer Langston (Seattle PI): New UW research study shows an  inverse correlation between property values and obesity rates around the Puget Sound area. It's interesting to me that Seattle actually has food security issues, since one of the things I tell all my friends outside Seattle is that there's a grocery store on every corner here, even in lower-income neighborhoods. Have you ever tried to shop for vegetables in West Oakland? I have, and believe me, we got it good here. Obviously, though, not good enough.

Raising Poultry the New-Old Way by Carol Ness (SF Chronicle): Thanks to The Omnivore's Dilemma, eco-foodies now want to buy eggs and meat from chickens raised beyond organically. But as this piece shows, pasturing chickens means a lot of extra work for farmers and much higher prices for consumers. Lest you call me an ignorant slut, I'll quickly add that the author thinks that this is a good thing. Bonus link: Where to find pastured chickens (and goats) in the Puget Sound.

To Burundi and Beyond for Coffee’s Holy Grail by Peter Meehan (NY Times): Yes, New York has finally discovered third-generation coffee roasters. What I love most about the ultra-artisanal coffee movement is that high-end coffee suppliers who purchase directly from quality-oriented bean growers are leaving fair trade in the dust. Don't miss the video sidebar on coffee cupping. Bonus link: This delicious little feud continues to develop; granted, most people on the East Coast think Dunkin' Donuts has good coffee.

 
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