Roger Downey writes in:

Rectangles are so . . . so square , aren’t they? No wonder “box wine” has a bad rap with stylish

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New Box in Town

A bottle-shaped cardboard cylinder with a rakishly cropped top

Roger Downey writes in:

Rectangles are so . . . so square, aren’t they? No wonder “box wine” has a bad rap with stylish drinkers. Jared Burns has an answer to that: The scion of Dennis Burns, inventor of the artificial wine cork, Jared got deep into wine during his time at Whitman College in Walla Walla, but he wasn’t interested in just making another good bottle of wine. His debut product, just hitting stores now, is called Revelry, Available in three flavors (chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon, and merlot) Revelry’s packaged in a bottle-shaped cardboard cylinder with a rakishly cropped top. About the size of a regular 750-milliliter bottle, the package contains twice as much wine, a liter and a half, while costing about the same (about $20 per package retail) as comparable single bottles.

The package also boasts a flashy party-on graphic by fashion artist Michel Canetti, plus some faux-noir self-promotion (“She had class . . .a smooth body . . . all the right curves. And I loved her spice, although she had a sweet side too. . . .”) But the product’s main selling plus, says marketing guy Joe Schindler, is the convenience for the customer of popping a container without worrying about half the contents going stale before it’s drunk. Inside the cardboard canister is a vacuum-sealed foil-coated plastic bag which keep air away from the contents and flavor fresh for more than a month. Not that it’s likely you’ll have a package around that long. Revelry is good stuff, at the right price.

rdowney@seattleweekly.com

 
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