TheBlackKeys1233.jpg
The Black Keys are among the high-profile artists who have withheld portions of their catalog from streaming services like Spotify and Rhapsody.
A great piece

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"Will We As Individuals Recognize That We're Not Entitled to Free Music?"

TheBlackKeys1233.jpg
The Black Keys are among the high-profile artists who have withheld portions of their catalog from streaming services like Spotify and Rhapsody.
A great piece went up on Stereogum last week by Chris Ruen that responds to some of the chatter around the controversial Internet Radio Fairness Act. Among other great points Ruen made, this ending in particularly sharp:

As has been true throughout this ugly debate, the success of any effort to establish fairness will come down to the attitudes and choices of fans. Will we as individuals recognize that we're not entitled to free music; that if artists want to release their work for free, it is quite easy for them to do so; that we all will benefit from a fair digital marketplace; that we may already have missed out on great third or fourth albums by artists who, logically responding to the lack of investment and fan support, now approach music as a part-time hobby, because they need to make a living doingsomething?

It's up to artists, fans, and labels to push for such fairness. It can most certainly be achieved with a bit of focus, clear communication, and effort. Then, perhaps, we will have built the Internet and the creative culture we all deserve.

I couldn't agree more.

See Also:

I Get to Do What I Love for A Living. Musicians Deserve a Shot at the Same

Just Because Jonathan Coulton's Career Has Been Aided By Piracy Doesn't Make It a Viable Business Model For Everyone

 
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