walkofftheearth.jpg
Walk Off the Earth, Selah Sue, the Mowglis

Showbox at the Market

Monday, Nov. 26

Becoming a viral sensation is the new standard in the

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Walk Off the Earth and Selah Sue - November 26 - Showbox at the Market

walkofftheearth.jpg
Walk Off the Earth, Selah Sue, the Mowglis

Showbox at the Market

Monday, Nov. 26

Becoming a viral sensation is the new standard in the internet age. We've seen it time and time again - via the millions of views given to videos like "Friday" and "Gangnam Style," or the meteoric rise of stars like Justin Bieber, Cody Simpson and Karmin. Now we've seen it once more, in the Cinderella story that is Walk Off The Earth.

Like many before them , Walk Off The Earth took the grassroots approach, building their fan base around a series of catchy covers and two independent releases. Their cover of Gotye's "Somebody That I Used To Know," -- a homemade video clip featuring all five members playing the song on a single acoustic guitar has garnered upward of 138 million views on YouTube, earned them a spot on Ellen -- and served as a catalyst to getting a record deal with Columbia. Their first major release, an EP entitled R.E.V.O, dropped in October.

While Monday's show in Seattle was far from sold-out, the group's newer material was full of tangible energy, especially on tracks "Red Hands" and "Summer Vibe." Yet it can't be overlooked that it seemed rehashed, the aforementioned "Red Hands" feeling eerily similar to Imagine Dragons' current chart-climber "Higher."

It's ironic that this sameness plagues the act's original material, because it's nearly vacant in their covers, or rather, reinterpretations: a pop-friendly take on B.O.B's version of "Magic," an amped-up rendition of the Beatles' "Eleanor Rigby," and the previously mentioned Gotye track (among others) -- which showcase their raw instrumental talents and knack for giving new life to already popular songs.

And though the Gotye track proved to be the most talked about moment of the show, there is promise in their unique approach to song arrangements, and the experience that comes with making more music.

Sandwiched between the bouncy, tribal-inspired pop sounds of the headliners, and LA-based openers the Mowglis, Belgian-born singer Selah Sue's soulful croon seemed a touch out of place, but more than appreciated, amongst the dancing crowd.

It's easy to compare Sue to another soul great, with her makeshift beehive and cat-like eye makeup, a parallel brought even more to light when the artist decided to cover Winehouse's "Valerie." And while the singer lacks the sheer numbers in Internet support, her husky vocals are enough to warrant (several) YouTube views.

As the singer mentioned, most of her songs were written around the time she was 15 years old, a casualty of her debut having just recently been released in the states, but her husky, grown-ass-woman vocal range halted any doubt that this lady can hold her own.

The strangest thing about the lineup Monday night was that each act seemed to be a new take on an already existing flavor. Walk Off the Earth could easily be categorized the lovechild of a handful of other up-coming acts (the most obvious surrogates being Walk The Moon and Milo Greene), while Selah Sue's emotionalism recalls that of the many soul sisters before her.

In the age of internet flashes in the pan, what comes next will determine if they have the talent, the tenacity -- the originality -- to stand the test of time. If their natural abilities and hunger to perform persist, the views will likely keep on coming. Click.

 
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