Milo Greene Turns Its Living Room Into Record Art

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Milo Greene plays the Crocodile tomorrow with Bahamas.
We like to think it's all about the music, but oftentimes it's the art on the cover of a record that draws us in. Sometimes it's enlightening. Sometimes it's controversial. But most of the time, it's just plain weird. Here, we'll try and decipher the meaning, the origin and the mystery behind some of our favorite cover art - with the goal of answering one simple question: What were they thinking?

The band: Milo Greene. This up-and coming folk-rock five piece make harmonious tunes of the communal variety with feel-good lyrics and catchy melodies. Led by tracks "1957" and "Don't Give Up On Me," the group's four-part harmonies and variety of instrumentation garnered them a spot opening for the Civil Wars last year. The group of multi-instrumentalists is currently trekking across the states in support of their self-titled debut with plans to head to Europe in the spring.

The album: Milo Greene (2012)

The art: The LA-based act chose an existing oil painting by an unknown California artist. The work, which currently hangs in band member Andrew Heringer's home, is an animated face of a man, consisting of varied shapes and colors.

The story: "Andrew's house is where me and Marlana moved to when we originally moved down to LA," says vocalist/guitarist Graham Fink. "It's where I first met Andrew and Marlana, and where we did a lot of demo-ing, writing, hanging out. I think that's the place where the four of us first wrote songs, and started rehearsing."

Heringer's house soon became the meeting ground for the band - an entity in it's own right - and the heart of their creative process. As the locale became an important factor in the Milo Greene equation, so too did the painting on the wall.

"At some point, when we were making that album, somebody suggested we just throw that painting on there and it ended up working out." Fink recalls.

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