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As opposed to our favorite songs, or songs we'd like to think define our listening habits, taking a look at what a person actually listens

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Saint Etienne's Bob Stanley Shares Words and Music About The Fall and Kelis

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As opposed to our favorite songs, or songs we'd like to think define our listening habits, taking a look at what a person actually listens to can be far more revealing. With that in mind, every week we ask an artist to take a look at the most-played songs in their iTunes libraries and share with us the results. We do this on the honor system, and we ask our subjects to share a few words about each song.

Formed by songwriters Pete Wiggs and Bob Stanley and fronted by vocalist Sarah Cracknell, Saint Etienne have been on the dance-pop scene for years but a slew of recent side projects have kept them busy outside the band. From Stanley's rock-n-roll journalism to Wiggs' numerous production credits, the trio share a wide-spanning passion for song craft and music culture as much as the Brit-pop inspired dance grooves of their group. The band's May release, Words and Music, broke a seven year lapse in albums, and Bob Stanley (pictured, left) stole a few moments from their current stateside tour to share a few words about the music he's been cranking on his iPod.

Saint Etienne play the Showbox Market Thursday, November 1st with Rose Melberg and Beat Connection DJs.

"Let Her Go," Birdie: Melancholic chords, electric piano, and vocal. It sounds like a misty Sunday by the seaside, maybe in Kent.

"New Face In Hell," The Fall: Fine kazoo work. Mark E. Smith is one of the greatest English story tellers who has ever lived. I remember the lyrics to this being printed in Smash Hits.

"Watchful Eye," Paradox: For a jungle record this is very slow, but there is so much going on in the loop I could listen to it for hours on end.

"Fairy Tale," Dana: I don't agree with her rather disappointing politics, but she had such a kind face in the seventies.

"Council Houses," Denim: The best song about post-war architecture I've ever heard. Really, I'm very jealous of it. Also has a large slab of humour. A huge achievement.

"Lil Star," Kelis: We did a festival with Kelis in Indonesia. She played drums, with an all female band, and looked like she was having a lot of fun. This is such a sweet song.

 
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