thefutureisnow.jpg
The NPR brass are letting their interns step on digital landmines. On Saturday, an intern named Emily wrote a blog post about how she doesn't

"/>

Quick, Somebody Tell NPR About Rhapsody!

thefutureisnow.jpg
The NPR brass are letting their interns step on digital landmines. On Saturday, an intern named Emily wrote a blog post about how she doesn't buy music, and why she and her peers wouldn't be buying music. UNLESS ...

I do think we will pay for convenience.

What I want is one massive Spotify-like catalog of music that will sync to my phone and various home entertainment devices. With this new universal database, everyone would have convenient access to everything that has ever been recorded and performance royalties would be distributed based on play counts (hopefully with more money going back to the artist than the present model). All I require is the ability to listen to what I want, when I want and how I want it. Is that too much to ask?

We couldn't agree more. That's why we subscribe to Seattle's Rhapsody! It doesn't have EVERY piece of music ever recorded (The Black Keys and Paul McCartney have their knickers in a twist about a few things), but it has 14 million songs. All of them can be streamed to your phone, PC, and Internet-connected devices for $10 a month. PAID streams pay better than FREE streams (like Spotify's free version).

The Future Is Now!

p.s. Artists for an Ethical Internet responded to Emily's post here. h/t Ben Gibbard's Twitter account.

 
comments powered by Disqus

Friends to Follow