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John Roderick is the singer and songwriter responsible for Seattle's the Long Winters. Send your questions to jroderick@seattleweekly.com .
This question is an excerpt from

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Hey, Roderick: Are University Music Programs Worth It?

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John Roderick is the singer and songwriter responsible for Seattle's the Long Winters. Send your questions to jroderick@seattleweekly.com.
This question is an excerpt from John Roderick's Q&A column in the March issue of SW's music magazine, Reverb Monthly, out Wednesday.

Dear John: Do Seattle's higher-learning schools do much to truly support the arts and/or music in Seattle and/or the world?

-- Anonymous

Roderick: My exposure to the music programs at local universities is fairly limited. I mean, I met dozens of Cornish "jazzbos" at after-hours hip-hop clubs back when you couldn't go into a party in this town without someone rapping about "integrity" over a stand-up-bass solo, but that scene never made the daylight. I tried to take some music classes at UW, but they were all reserved for music majors, so my music education there came from listening to people practice vocal scales while I played stoned Frisbee on the quad.

Periodically I meet someone who studied music at a local college and now gigs out, but they're the exception rather than the rule. Most Seattle musicians I know learned to play their instrument the old-fashioned way: by sucking at it and claiming that their suckiness was actually art.

 
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