demonhunter.jpeg
Demon Hunter

The World is a Thorn

Solid State

Metal isn't for everyone, but neither is Beethoven, Mozart or Bach.

Both bend time and manipulate

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You May Not Like The World is a Thorn, But I Bet Mozart or Bach Would

demonhunter.jpeg
Demon Hunter

The World is a Thorn

Solid State

Metal isn't for everyone, but neither is Beethoven, Mozart or Bach.

Both bend time and manipulate key signatures, putting an emphasis on finely executed instrumentation instead of lyrics (whether you can understand them or not), but one is likely to be considered angelic and peaceful, while the other is an aural portal to hell. What a sham.

The World is a Thorn is one of the most impressive metal albums I've heard in the last year, but will it be regarded as so by the general populous? Absolutely not. The difference between metal and classical is that one elicits respect - whether you think it's boring or not - and the other is seen by many as a waste of space in record stores.

That's where I beg to differ. The record's first song, "Descending Upon Us," is a breathtaking example of what can be accomplished by a few guys who are far too good at their instruments. The first 47 seconds are smooth and jovial, with a resonating bell in the background and a guitar solo akin to Transiberian Orchestra. It almost sounds like a heavy christmas song, given the time of year it was released. Then the walls collapse. What ensues is a massive crescendo that explodes with rhythmic strumming and gentle sweeps.

Next is "LifeWar," a slow, pounding song with a snare drum tuned as tight as possible, popping like a marching drum. Fans of Disturbed would feel right at home, and head-bangers would would either be in heaven ... or hell, depending on the strength and size of your neck muscles. Behind all the instrumentation is a creepy, ominous little melody.

"Driving Nails" shows the band's ability to play it cool, with a melodic, ballad-like hymn of inspiring vocals and engulfing guitars. The song eats you up and makes you want to start a new hobby. It's beautiful, really, to hear such fervency.

"Shallow Water" is proof that not every song is suitable for Rock Band. Jumping multiple octaves with shrill cries, the guitar gives you blisters just listening to it. And the drums? Somebody owes drummer Timothy Watts an entire pack of gold stars. And a case of water. And a hug.

Despite the grandeur of The World is a Thorn, I can't help but feel sad. It's an album like that this makes me cringe when I turn on the radio or step within 30-feet of a college bar. Sure, LMFAO can make your foot tap, but where's the passion? The utterly fantastic talent? Why is it that such a pivotal branch of music is shunned because it makes you want to push the person standing next to you?

Take a listen to The World is a Thorn, then push back.

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