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Thirty Tigers
You can read all about the tangled path Jesse Sykes took en route to Marble Son , the best record of her career,

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New York Times Hugs Up Jesse Sykes' Marble Son, the Best Album of Her Career

sykessweethereafter1.jpg
Thirty Tigers
You can read all about the tangled path Jesse Sykes took en route to Marble Son, the best record of her career, in Litsa Dremousis' piece in the paper this week. And while I still think Mike Seely's declaration that Marble Son "sounds like the Allman Brothers backing up Jesse Sykes," is the most succinct analysis of the record yet, yesterday in The New York Times, chief pop music critic Jon Pareles offers his own glowing review:

From the reverbed handclaps and feedback-laced minor chord that open the first song, the music points directly to the San Francisco trinity of the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane and Quicksilver Messenger Service. The band has mastered the most difficult tempo of the era: the slow-to-ambling pace that breathes without rushing or dragging. Guitars and keyboards take varying paths through each song, gathering for dynamic swells that grow overwhelming, and overlapping in ways that only appear to be serendipitous. There's nothing neo- about this band's psychedelia.

It's exciting times for Sykes and her band, The Sweet Hereafter, for sure.

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Leia Jospe
P.S.: In the same piece, Pareles offers positive notes on Mathieu Santo's Massachusetts 2010, out on Seattle's Barsuk Records, saying:

The 35-minute album isn't some major statement, but it's an enjoyable glimpse into one musician's fixations.

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