Remember when The Fast and the Furious came out in 2001? I recall it being pretty damn watchable--although to be honest I haven't had the

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Fast Five Is Not a Good Movie, But Its Rio-Dotted Soundtrack Is Worthwhile

Remember when The Fast and the Furious came out in 2001? I recall it being pretty damn watchable--although to be honest I haven't had the guts to go back and see it again to challenge the memory. That said, Fast Five is almost certainly a worse flick. The cars aren't as sexy, the plot's more predictable, and The Rock's teeth-gnashingly bad delivery makes Paul Walker look like he's won more than a couple of Teen Choice Awards.

But the flick's one winning factor is the gorgeous panoramic shots of Rio de Janeiro, favelas and all, where much of it was set. And accompanying the locale is a score dotted with local music, from tropicália artist Carlinhos Brown to rapper MV Bill. Knowing almost nothing about Rio's rap, the musical accompaniment to Fast Five offered a couple of entry points--none better than Marcelo D2's "Desabofo."

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Translating as "relief of tension and anxiety through the expression of repressed thoughts and feelings," the song is a prime example of the MCs trademark sound that augments American hip-hop with Brazilian samba sounds. Shelling out $10 to see Fast Five in theaters may not be a great investment, but spending a little more on A Arte Do Barulho--home to "Desabafo" and 11 other tracks that deal with smoking weed and partying as much as favela struggles--will see far greater returns.

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