NeilYoungDrivesHome_(c)GrahamNash.jpg
Graham Nash
Neil Young, driving home.
Like last year, the car I'm driving over is extremely cushy, has a V-8 engine, and the CDs are

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Driving to/From/Around Sasquatch! The Soundtrack (Or, How Not to Get Cabin Fever)

NeilYoungDrivesHome_(c)GrahamNash.jpg
Graham Nash
Neil Young, driving home.
Like last year, the car I'm driving over is extremely cushy, has a V-8 engine, and the CDs are loaded through the trunk. Since I'm lazy, I tend to resort to the tape deck. This is OK. In fact, it's optimal. Picking only what's available on cassette is refreshingly simple. There are only so many options.

But I'm going to mix it up this year. Last year, photographer Renee McMahon and I listened exclusively to the GGNZLA-issued Dutchess & the Duke tape that includes both of their "records," She's the Dutchess/He's the Duke, and Sunset/Sunrise. It worked, but I'm not taking any chances this year. Obviously, Renee gets veto power again this year -- and she typically totes a treasure trove of her own, and is more patient with the trunk-loading situation.

All of these tapes were purchased for a dollar at Ballard's Leary Records. Actually, scratch that: all three of these tapes were 20 percent off (purchased on Record Store Day). So, here's a look at our 240-cent soundtrack to the trip to/from/and around Sasquatch! 2011:

stonesremastered.jpg
Yes! Digitally remastered!
The Rolling Stones, Out of Our Heads, 1965: This is the closest kin to Dutchess & the Duke, and, like D&D, it's a real work horse. This has been in heavy/constant rotation since April. Their cover of "That's How Strong My Love Is," is a cherry bit of the Stones' marriage of American R&B and the British garage. I spent the first couple decades of my Stones-listening life skimming the greatest hits compilations. When I started digging around through the original records, I became addicted. It's the cuts between "Satisfaction" and "The Last Time" where things get really exciting.

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Simon & Garfunkel, Bookends, 1968: This pack of familiar, mellow jams are beautiful enough to stand up against the picturesque fields and mountains we'll be traversing. They're also easy to tune out, and a treat to let sink in. We've heard these songs a million times, but when was the last time you had an hour to just let them sink in without the distraction of email, the internet, etc? There's no better way to get to know a record or to allow an album to become a bookmark in your life than on a road trip.

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Bruce Springsteen, Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J., 1973: I'm going to come clean and say that if I've ever heard this record in its entirety, I don't remember. I know, I know, this makes me unfit for my job. Much as I enjoy Born in the U.S.A. and Born to Run, I'm not a Springsteen devotee. Though lately, several parts of his catalogue have been pushed my direction, and I'm beginning to settle in for some longer listens. This trip provides the perfect opportunity.
 
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