mgoodness28.jpg
Todd Bradley
Photos from the show will be added shortly.
My Goodness

Rendezvous

Friday, April 8

My Goodness , indeed. Sometimes (OK, a lot of

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My Goodness Lives Up to the Hype, Friday at Rendezvous

mgoodness28.jpg
Todd Bradley
Photos from the show will be added shortly.
My Goodness

Rendezvous

Friday, April 8

My Goodness, indeed. Sometimes (OK, a lot of the time in Seattle) you hear a bunch about a band before you ever get the chance to see them live. Then you wait for a while in heated anticipation of their next gig. Not all acts live up to the hype, but My Goodness more than exceeded it at their album-release party Friday at the Rendezvous.

The blues-punk duo of Joel Schneider and Ethan Jacobsen has been on Reverb's radar since last October, when our editor Chris Kornelis first saw them at the 2 Bit Saloon and got instantly hooked on their Black Keys-esque "swamp rock." He's been impatient for their debut album ever since, and will finally get his wish next week when it comes out on local label Sarathan Records. But as I'm usually late to the party, Friday marked my first chance to catch their live show.

As they took the stage swathed in masses of fog from the smoke machine, the room was full of anticipation. But the band delivered from the first notes, Schneider thrashing in a whirlwind of hair and distortion while Jacobsen steadfastly pounded the drums. After the first few songs, it was clear My Goodness is onto something in their straightforward songwriting, stormy riffs, and lovelorn lyrics. Maybe it was just the impassioned delivery, but I got the sense there was a lot of woe there. It can be hard to find new adjectives for a relatively uncomplicated blues rock band, but describing their sound on Twitter, Mike Johnston of Seattle Playlist probably said it the best: "How about a tornado fighting its way outta a rock band?" Their energy inspired some full-fledged crowd-surfing, which in a space as tight as the JewelBox is impressive indeed. After a blistering but short-ish set, the crowd was eager for an encore, but Schneider confessed they'd already played every song in their catalog.

Of course, anytime you have a guitar/drums duo that fuses blues and rock, you're bound to get compared to the Black Keys and the White Stripes. (At least My Goodness don't have it as bad as White Mystery--their name tells you all you need to know.) And yes, the comparison is unavoidable for MG's dirty, bluesy songs, but with the Stripes out of the picture and the Keys selling out giant amphitheaters whenever they tour, there's plenty of room for a band who's still playing hundred-person venues. After all, that's the way garage bands are meant to be seen.

Random thought I had while watching Schneider rock out: Headbanging would be a lot less impressive if the headbanger (headbangee?) had a buzzcut.

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